What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
Rick Murphy
 
Posts: 51
Joined: March 7th 2011, 4:43pm

What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #1  Postby Rick Murphy » June 16th 2011, 12:03pm

I tend to keep them several years and often use them as aperitifs. If I serve them with food, I have them with Oriental food or even with ham. I had a '93 Rheingau Auslese with a dish consisting of chicken thighs, soy sauce and honey. The match was excellent. How do you use yours at table?

Rick

Advertisement

User avatar
Berry Crawford
 
Posts: 10007
Joined: February 9th 2009, 9:16pm
Location: Near the Sierra Foothills

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #2  Postby Berry Crawford » June 16th 2011, 12:18pm

Older Auslese are good with bold or spicy food. I use modern style Auslese as sipping wine and don't really have too many with dinner.
Jane Crabill
 
Posts: 1027
Joined: March 28th 2011, 12:34pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #3  Postby Jane Crabill » June 16th 2011, 12:33pm

Maybe with a fruit dessert such as peach pie or peach cobbler.
Fayetteville, NC
User avatar
Keith Levenberg
 
Posts: 5326
Joined: June 6th 2009, 3:11pm
Location: Washington, D.C.

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #4  Postby Keith Levenberg » June 16th 2011, 12:35pm

It's hard to generalize with auslese. Some work as table wines, others are for dessert.
User avatar
John Morris
SubscriberSubscriber
 
Posts: 12528
Joined: June 21st 2009, 2:09pm
Location: New York City

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #5  Postby John Morris » June 16th 2011, 1:01pm

Jane Crabill wrote:Maybe with a fruit dessert such as peach pie or peach cobbler.


I would avoid that because you don't want to have the two sweet things competing. There's a real danger the wine will taste lousy. Maybe with unsweetened fruit, but conventional desserts are dangerous with sweet wines. A relatively unsweet almond or walnut cake is a good foil, though.

As Auslese dry out, they can work wonderfully with smoked fish of any sort. Or as an aperitif.
"In the long story of civilization, the moments when improving your lot beats out annoying your neighbor are vanishingly rare." – Adam Gopnik, 2012

"Here is the land of mirth, as Germany is the land of metaphysics and France is the land of fornication. Here the buffoonery never stops." – H.L. Mencken, 1922
User avatar
Howard Cooper
(Online)
SubscriberSubscriber
 
Posts: 12735
Joined: May 30th 2009, 8:37am
Location: Rockville, MD

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #6  Postby Howard Cooper » June 16th 2011, 1:06pm

What to do with German Auslesen? I drink them!!!!!!!!!
Howard

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister
salilb
 
Posts: 1500
Joined: August 2nd 2010, 2:10am

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #7  Postby salilb » June 16th 2011, 1:14pm

The ones from Weil, AJ Adam, Catoir or basically anything from 2006 - treat as dessert wines and drink them after a meal.

Among the lighter/botrytis-free Auslese (from the likes of Kruger-Rumpf, Grunhaus, Selbach, Christoffel) - if younger, I'll open them with moderately spiced food (North Indian, Szechuan, Thai). With older ones where the sweetness has started to fade, I'll try and pair them with a relatively simple meal (pork tenderloin, roast game birds) that'll allow the wine to take center stage.
B℮n℮gaɭ
Olivier Landry
 
Posts: 190
Joined: January 31st 2011, 1:47pm
Location: Quebec

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #8  Postby Olivier Landry » June 16th 2011, 1:25pm

I serve them with the cheese plate, I've found that it went incredibly well with many cheeses.
Used to be ITB (2007-2015).
User avatar
Keith Levenberg
 
Posts: 5326
Joined: June 6th 2009, 3:11pm
Location: Washington, D.C.

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #9  Postby Keith Levenberg » June 16th 2011, 1:27pm

salilb wrote:moderately spiced food (North Indian, Szechuan, Thai)

I like that you find these moderately spiced. Have some more qong qing chicken.
User avatar
Berry Crawford
 
Posts: 10007
Joined: February 9th 2009, 9:16pm
Location: Near the Sierra Foothills

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #10  Postby Berry Crawford » June 16th 2011, 1:34pm

salilb wrote:The ones from Weil, AJ Adam, Catoir or basically anything from 2006 - treat as dessert wines and drink them after a meal.

Among the lighter/botrytis-free Auslese (from the likes of Kruger-Rumpf, Grunhaus, Selbach, Christoffel) - if younger, I'll open them with moderately spiced food (North Indian, Szechuan, Thai). With older ones where the sweetness has started to fade, I'll try and pair them with a relatively simple meal (pork tenderloin, roast game birds) that'll allow the wine to take center stage.


But what do you do with your Egon Muller auction auslese?
salilb
 
Posts: 1500
Joined: August 2nd 2010, 2:10am

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #11  Postby salilb » June 16th 2011, 1:41pm

Keith Levenberg wrote:
salilb wrote:moderately spiced food (North Indian, Szechuan, Thai)

I like that you find these moderately spiced. Have some more qong qing chicken.

I had things like the gui zhou chicken or the shredded beef with green pepper in mind when I said that, not the weaponized chicken dish!
B℮n℮gaɭ
User avatar
Keith Levenberg
 
Posts: 5326
Joined: June 6th 2009, 3:11pm
Location: Washington, D.C.

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #12  Postby Keith Levenberg » June 16th 2011, 1:47pm

salilb wrote:
Keith Levenberg wrote:
salilb wrote:moderately spiced food (North Indian, Szechuan, Thai)

I like that you find these moderately spiced. Have some more qong qing chicken.

I had things like the gui zhou chicken or the shredded beef with green pepper in mind when I said that, not the weaponized chicken dish!

I've heard there's chicken in there somewhere.
Image
salilb
 
Posts: 1500
Joined: August 2nd 2010, 2:10am

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #13  Postby salilb » June 16th 2011, 2:02pm

I'll bookmark that photo for the "What do you do with German TBA" thread.
B℮n℮gaɭ
User avatar
Brian G r a f s t r o m
(Online)
SubscriberSubscriber
up to no good
 
Posts: 16170
Joined: February 3rd 2009, 1:54am
Location: westside

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #14  Postby Brian G r a f s t r o m » June 16th 2011, 4:55pm

Turkey
Chicken
Duck
Pheasant ... seeing a theme here ;)

Lobster
Crab
Swordfish

Chinese stir-fry
Thai food (curries, stir-frys)

Epoisses

{nothing} -- drink on its own!
Los Angeles Workers' Compensation and Personal Injury

“All these characters spend their time explaining themselves, and happily recognizing that they hold the same opinions … how important they consider it to think the same things all together.” --- A.R.

CT handle: grafstrb
Rick Murphy
 
Posts: 51
Joined: March 7th 2011, 4:43pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #15  Postby Rick Murphy » June 16th 2011, 6:23pm

Brian, you reminded me how good Auslese is with Duck a L'Orange. Yum.
GregT
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: April 15th 2009, 3:12pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #16  Postby GregT » June 16th 2011, 7:59pm

I have them when I'm having "snack" type things. Like smoked duck breast, a few cheeses, maybe some sausage, maybe some duck or goose liver, etc. That ends up being supper many a night and sweet wines go really well with those things.
G . T a t a r
Scott Ho11owe11
 
Posts: 1173
Joined: January 4th 2010, 3:33pm
Location: Hood River, OR

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #17  Postby Scott Ho11owe11 » June 16th 2011, 8:25pm

Brian G r a f s t r o m wrote:Turkey
Chicken
Duck
Pheasant ... seeing a theme here ;)

Lobster
Crab
Swordfish

Chinese stir-fry
Thai food (curries, stir-frys)

Epoisses

{nothing} -- drink on its own!


In a wine bistro tonight and evaluating buying a few older Rieslings...TN from Grafstrb = Good wine. Too bad it was priced at 300% CT Avg Value... [swearing.gif]
Aliens do exist. They are waitin
User avatar
Brian G r a f s t r o m
(Online)
SubscriberSubscriber
up to no good
 
Posts: 16170
Joined: February 3rd 2009, 1:54am
Location: westside

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #18  Postby Brian G r a f s t r o m » June 17th 2011, 7:19am

which wine was it, scott?

really hope you didn't pass on the 1990 Karthäuserhof Eitelsbacher Karthäuserhofberg Riesling Auslese #13 --- that wine rocks!
Los Angeles Workers' Compensation and Personal Injury

“All these characters spend their time explaining themselves, and happily recognizing that they hold the same opinions … how important they consider it to think the same things all together.” --- A.R.

CT handle: grafstrb
User avatar
Isaac James Baker
 
Posts: 531
Joined: February 19th 2011, 4:51pm
Location: Washington, DC

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #19  Postby Isaac James Baker » June 17th 2011, 7:38am

Howard Cooper wrote:What to do with German Auslesen? I drink them!!!!!!!!!

my sentiments exactly. if i've got a good deutsche auslese, all i need is a glass.
User avatar
D@vid Bu3ker
SubscriberSubscriber
Rieslingfan
 
Posts: 23301
Joined: February 14th 2009, 9:06am

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #20  Postby D@vid Bu3ker » June 17th 2011, 8:18am

Isaac James Baker wrote:
Howard Cooper wrote:What to do with German Auslesen? I drink them!!!!!!!!!

my sentiments exactly. if i've got a good deutsche auslese, all i need is a glass.


You need a glass?
David Bueker - Rieslingfan
User avatar
Isaac James Baker
 
Posts: 531
Joined: February 19th 2011, 4:51pm
Location: Washington, DC

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #21  Postby Isaac James Baker » June 17th 2011, 8:21am

David M. Bueker wrote:
Isaac James Baker wrote:
Howard Cooper wrote:What to do with German Auslesen? I drink them!!!!!!!!!

my sentiments exactly. if i've got a good deutsche auslese, all i need is a glass.


You need a glass?

ha. yeah, i do. you can't get those amazing auslese aromatics when you drink straight from the bottle :-)
JG Salazar
 
Posts: 52
Joined: November 17th 2009, 3:24pm
Location: NYC

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #22  Postby JG Salazar » June 17th 2011, 8:25am

The fried chicken at Momofuku, or any fried chicken for that matter, works well with aged auslese.
Jesse Salazar ITB - USQ
User avatar
Howard Cooper
(Online)
SubscriberSubscriber
 
Posts: 12735
Joined: May 30th 2009, 8:37am
Location: Rockville, MD

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #23  Postby Howard Cooper » June 17th 2011, 9:31am

Isaac James Baker wrote:
David M. Bueker wrote:
Isaac James Baker wrote:
Howard Cooper wrote:What to do with German Auslesen? I drink them!!!!!!!!!

my sentiments exactly. if i've got a good deutsche auslese, all i need is a glass.


You need a glass?

ha. yeah, i do. you can't get those amazing auslese aromatics when you drink straight from the bottle :-)


Great point. [drinkers.gif] [welldone.gif]
Howard

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister
Rick Murphy
 
Posts: 51
Joined: March 7th 2011, 4:43pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #24  Postby Rick Murphy » June 17th 2011, 11:40am

Fried chicken? I never considered that but I'm willing to give it a whirl.

Rick
salilb
 
Posts: 1500
Joined: August 2nd 2010, 2:10am

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #25  Postby salilb » June 17th 2011, 12:50pm

JG Salazar wrote:The fried chicken at Momofuku, or any fried chicken for that matter, works well with aged auslese.

Haven't yet been to Momofuku (do they allow BYO?), but the fried chicken at Soul Flavors in Jersey City has always gone well with Riesling.
B℮n℮gaɭ
johngonzales
 
Posts: 5932
Joined: June 19th 2009, 6:07pm
Location: City of Angels

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #26  Postby johngonzales » June 18th 2011, 4:22pm

John Morris wrote:
Jane Crabill wrote:Maybe with a fruit dessert such as peach pie or peach cobbler.


I would avoid that because you don't want to have the two sweet things competing. There's a real danger the wine will taste lousy. Maybe with unsweetened fruit, but conventional desserts are dangerous with sweet wines. A relatively unsweet almond or walnut cake is a good foil, though.

As Auslese dry out, they can work wonderfully with smoked fish of any sort. Or as an aperitif.


Really? I think a sweet wine and sweet dessert go fine together. In fact if a dessert is sweet, I think it's preferable to make sure the wine has an ample amount of sweetness to match. Otherwise the wine can come off as acidic/astringent/tart. The two sweet things are heavy on the palate, but the flavors match.
The problem with Auslese is that there can be varying levels of sweetness and in general it is not sweet enough to go with most desserts. The unsweet cake is a good idea, even to the extent of an apple dessert that is not very sweet. For the less sweet, aged Auslese poultry, pates, lighter pork dishes work. My favorites would be asian food with some heat, or cheeses (esp. blue).
User avatar
Howard Camhi
 
Posts: 121
Joined: December 28th 2009, 9:17pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #27  Postby Howard Camhi » June 18th 2011, 5:33pm

Olivier Landry wrote:I serve them with the cheese plate, I've found that it went incredibly well with many cheeses.


Exactly right. . . [winner.gif]
Brent Houk
 
Posts: 113
Joined: April 29th 2010, 4:37pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #28  Postby Brent Houk » June 19th 2011, 5:10pm

Spicy Asian, yes; also rich dishes like pates, and grilled pork with fruit glazes or chutneys (a peach compote works great). Same for richer Spatlesen -- with some bottle age they are remarkably good with these foods.
User avatar
Bill Klapp (deactivated)
 
Posts: 5039
Joined: June 27th 2009, 12:50am
Location: Neive, Italy and Burgundy, France

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #29  Postby Bill Klapp (deactivated) » June 19th 2011, 6:00pm

First choice Thai food, and I agree with Jane that dessert does the trick, too. All I need say is Lotus of Siam in Vegas, and I believe also in NYC (or on its way). They have (or had) the greatest German Riesling cellar that I have ever experienced, and very little else in it. The greatest pairing trick in the entire world of wine is pitting sweetness in a dish against sweetness in a wine such as an Auslese, Sauternes, etc. You get it right (and it is not very hard to do-foie gras with a fresh fig (mango, cherries, many fruits will do) compote or with said fruit in a reduction, for example), and the sweetness in the food neutralizes the sweetness in the wine, and not only does not spoil the wine, it transforms it into an off-dry-to-dry wine that reveals tastes (aromas are aromas, that does not change, of course) and nuances that the sweet wine alone cannot deliver otherwise. Regarding dessert, you would not want, say, something sugary-sweet like pecan pie, but rather, something subtly sweet. (A little-seen late-spring Piemontese specialty comes to mind: fried acacia blossoms drizzled with acacia honey, as antipasto or dessert!) This theory also gives us combos like strawberries and aged balsamic vinegar. A greater-than-the-sum-of-its-parts experience, if ever there was one...
User avatar
Bill Tex Landreth
SubscriberSubscriber
Ayatollah of Rum & Cola
 
Posts: 21646
Joined: January 27th 2009, 12:45pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #30  Postby Bill Tex Landreth » June 19th 2011, 6:13pm

ITB: Elmo Wagyu Cattle Company

"A cow is a biological machine invented by humans to turn grass into steak."--Neil deGrasse Tyson
User avatar
John Morris
SubscriberSubscriber
 
Posts: 12528
Joined: June 21st 2009, 2:09pm
Location: New York City

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #31  Postby John Morris » June 20th 2011, 11:27am

johngonzales wrote:
John Morris wrote:
Jane Crabill wrote:Maybe with a fruit dessert such as peach pie or peach cobbler.


I would avoid that because you don't want to have the two sweet things competing. There's a real danger the wine will taste lousy. Maybe with unsweetened fruit, but conventional desserts are dangerous with sweet wines. A relatively unsweet almond or walnut cake is a good foil, though.

As Auslese dry out, they can work wonderfully with smoked fish of any sort. Or as an aperitif.


Really? I think a sweet wine and sweet dessert go fine together. In fact if a dessert is sweet, I think it's preferable to make sure the wine has an ample amount of sweetness to match. Otherwise the wine can come off as acidic/astringent/tart. The two sweet things are heavy on the palate, but the flavors match.


I'm not sure we disagree in theory: It all depends on how sweet the dessert is. But I find that most desserts are far too sweet to match up with Auslese or other sweet wines. They either compete or make the wine seem undersweet. And it's risky unless you know the match from experience, because it's hard to gauge the sweetness of a riesling and it's hard to gauge in advance how it will match with a particular sweet.

I've had good luck making nut cakes where I cut the sugar in the recipe substantially.
"In the long story of civilization, the moments when improving your lot beats out annoying your neighbor are vanishingly rare." – Adam Gopnik, 2012

"Here is the land of mirth, as Germany is the land of metaphysics and France is the land of fornication. Here the buffoonery never stops." – H.L. Mencken, 1922
User avatar
J Diven
SubscriberSubscriber
 
Posts: 1088
Joined: August 14th 2009, 1:28pm
Location: Seattle

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #32  Postby J Diven » June 20th 2011, 11:52am

JG Salazar wrote:The fried chicken at Momofuku, or any fried chicken for that matter, works well with aged auslese.


you know where i'm going with this - even the dreaded... Colonel??? [shock.gif] Or Popeye's maybe?
Jim
User avatar
Bill Tex Landreth
SubscriberSubscriber
Ayatollah of Rum & Cola
 
Posts: 21646
Joined: January 27th 2009, 12:45pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #33  Postby Bill Tex Landreth » June 20th 2011, 12:00pm

J Diven wrote:
JG Salazar wrote:The fried chicken at Momofuku, or any fried chicken for that matter, works well with aged auslese.


you know where i'm going with this - even the dreaded... Colonel??? [shock.gif] Or Popeye's maybe?


Spicy Popeye's calls for bubbles and/or German Riesling.
ITB: Elmo Wagyu Cattle Company

"A cow is a biological machine invented by humans to turn grass into steak."--Neil deGrasse Tyson
User avatar
richardhod
 
Posts: 58
Joined: January 27th 2011, 8:14pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #34  Postby richardhod » June 20th 2011, 1:13pm

John Morris wrote:
Jane Crabill wrote:Maybe with a fruit dessert such as peach pie or peach cobbler.


I would avoid that because you don't want to have the two sweet things competing. There's a real danger the wine will taste lousy. Maybe with unsweetened fruit, but conventional desserts are dangerous with sweet wines. A relatively unsweet almond or walnut cake is a good foil, though.

As Auslese dry out, they can work wonderfully with smoked fish of any sort. Or as an aperitif.


I agree with that. I don't like to drink a great late harvest noble rot wine with sweet things, as the interplay of sweet with tart/mineralbotrytis that I look for in those wines can be flattened by the lack of sweet perception when paired with sweet food. I'm guessing the same would go for Auslese which I haven't yet tried (shock, horror! if anyone has any good entry-to-medium-level Auslese to recommend, be my guest, please!!!).
Richard Hodkinson
User avatar
John Morris
SubscriberSubscriber
 
Posts: 12528
Joined: June 21st 2009, 2:09pm
Location: New York City

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #35  Postby John Morris » June 20th 2011, 1:20pm

Bill Klapp wrote:The greatest pairing trick in the entire world of wine is pitting sweetness in a dish against sweetness in a wine such as an Auslese, Sauternes, etc. You get it right (and it is not very hard to do-foie gras with a fresh fig (mango, cherries, many fruits will do) compote or with said fruit in a reduction, for example), and the sweetness in the food neutralizes the sweetness in the wine, and not only does not spoil the wine, it transforms it into an off-dry-to-dry wine that reveals tastes (aromas are aromas, that does not change, of course) and nuances that the sweet wine alone cannot deliver otherwise. Regarding dessert, you would not want, say, something sugary-sweet like pecan pie, but rather, something subtly sweet.


When I was served foie gras with Japanese apple pear and an old JJ Prum years ago, it was a revelation. The secret is that that the dish isn't that sweet.

Most American desserts are so way sweet that they are a problem for sweet wines. Almost all fruit pies would be disastrous, for example.
"In the long story of civilization, the moments when improving your lot beats out annoying your neighbor are vanishingly rare." – Adam Gopnik, 2012

"Here is the land of mirth, as Germany is the land of metaphysics and France is the land of fornication. Here the buffoonery never stops." – H.L. Mencken, 1922
User avatar
Bill Klapp (deactivated)
 
Posts: 5039
Joined: June 27th 2009, 12:50am
Location: Neive, Italy and Burgundy, France

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #36  Postby Bill Klapp (deactivated) » June 20th 2011, 1:37pm

Every word of that true. I would not bring chocolate anywhere near a Riesling, and think of how we Americans love our rich, overdone, triple and quadruple chocolate desserts. With perfectly ripe fruit, I'll bet that I could fashion you a fruit pie, or, more likely, a fruit tart with an almond crust or some such, that would get the job done, but as you observed, it would not be any sweeter than it needed to be. A fresh plum tart with minimal sugar added. Or maybe I will just throw the plums in with the foie gras! The Japanese apple pear is a fine example of the point that I am trying to make. Also, I am used to Italian desserts, which are rarely sweet by our standards, and often driven by peak-of-season fresh fruit or nuts, as you mentioned...
Ian Fitzsimmons
 
Posts: 2754
Joined: August 3rd 2010, 7:17am

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #37  Postby Ian Fitzsimmons » June 20th 2011, 1:52pm

My two cents, I like still-sweetish Auslesen cool as an apertif. As the sugar integrates with age, as John says, they can be remarkably versatile, and the key is to match acidity and weight with the food. I find Auslesen often more delicate than Kabinets and Spaelesen, which I'm more likely to eat with spicy main courses. Cheeses are good; smoked trout is a sure thing.
Paul Seah
 
Posts: 1399
Joined: February 2nd 2010, 9:12pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #38  Postby Paul Seah » June 21st 2011, 2:40am

Just had a bottle of 1994 Gunderloch NG Auslese wiht dim sum today - it was beautiful with a whole variety of little dishes.
CT username: Paul S
User avatar
Bill Klapp (deactivated)
 
Posts: 5039
Joined: June 27th 2009, 12:50am
Location: Neive, Italy and Burgundy, France

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #39  Postby Bill Klapp (deactivated) » June 21st 2011, 12:23pm

Paul Seah wrote:Just had a bottle of 1994 Gunderloch NG Auslese wiht dim sum today - it was beautiful with a whole variety of little dishes.


That has real potential, as there is a touch of sweetness here and there in dim sum, and if not sweetness per se, certainly umami. That seems to me better than all the Chateauneuf-du-Pape that gets downed with dim sum at Mark's Duck House by...well, you-know-who!
User avatar
NickWittman
 
Posts: 998
Joined: April 21st 2009, 3:37pm
Location: Santa Rosa, Ca

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #40  Postby NickWittman » June 21st 2011, 1:07pm

Like to age good Auslese, and generally find it a nice alternative to a Sauternes as an end of meal wine, ideally paired with cheese. That aside, will drink one with Cajun food!
ITB - Santa Rosa Fine Wine
Robert Sand
 
Posts: 327
Joined: August 13th 2010, 1:19pm

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #41  Postby Robert Sand » June 21st 2011, 11:26pm

Despite the usual use with hot or spicy Asian dishes German Auslesen can also be excellent with
- creamy soups
- certain fish *
- certain entrails *
- certain poultry or birds *
- mild cheese
- fruity desserts
- not too sweet desserts like bisquite cakes, puddings
* always depending on the sauce
User avatar
Frank Deis
SubscriberSubscriber
 
Posts: 4857
Joined: June 3rd 2009, 7:29pm
Location: NJ

Re: What do you do with German Riesling Auslese?

Post #42  Postby Frank Deis » June 22nd 2011, 8:08am

I had great success serving a Mosel Auslese with an appetizer of smoked trout, capers, chopped shallot and goat cheese served on toast. It was one of the Maximin Grünhaus wines from von Schubert, a 2002 and it was killer stuff. A Spätlese would have lacked the intensity that I wanted with the strong flavors of the fish/caper/onion.
ITB = "I Teach Biochemistry"

Return to Wine Talk

logo
Food Advertising by