Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

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James Wright
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Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#51 Post by James Wright » April 14th, 2018, 10:59 am

Gerhard P. wrote:
Karl K wrote:Oh yes Austrian SB - good idea.

Have not had Weingut Gross but Glatzer is excellent!
A Sauvignon bl. tasting without Austrian wines (from Styria) is no real Sauvignon bl. tasting ....
[cheers.gif]

although i think the most impressive Sauvignon Blanc from Austria
year-in, year-out, young or well-aged
is the Steinmühle from Kollwentz in Burgenland...

but then again, you are from Graz, so likely to favour the Steiermark...
~ Verteidiger der Wahrheit ~

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Jim Stewart
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#52 Post by Jim Stewart » October 18th, 2020, 2:55 pm

IlkkaL wrote:
March 15th, 2018, 2:21 am
If you are looking for a number of drastically different Sancerres you could consider having the following:

A typical steel-fermented one from for example Boulay or F. Cotat
Alphonse Mellot Generation XIX (fairly big with some oak)
Sebastien Riffault Akméniné (the freaky end of the appellation)
Hey Ilkka , I'm replying to this old post of yours because tonight we opened an Alphonse Mellot La Moussiere Sancerre Blanc and the taste profile is very different from what I am used to in Sancerre Blanc. My previous many examples were uniformly marked by acid almost to the point of electricity sometimes, a citrus fruit profile, crisp and mineral. This La Moussiere is almost unrecognizable to me as a Sancerre: round versus crisp, muted acid, fruit profile to the riper almost sweet side and non-citrus to me. Also seemed to have some spiciness maybe from some oak. I was going to explain it by the vintage (this is a 2018) but I found your post looking for previous comments about Alphonse Mellot. I am now thinking maybe this is just a different style of Sancerre Blanc, that I have not experienced? Any thoughts? Thanks.

P.S. While this Sancerre is different from my previous experiences, I like this style and the wine "works" for me. I just have broadened my idea of Sancerre maybe.
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Kirk.Grant
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#53 Post by Kirk.Grant » October 18th, 2020, 4:00 pm

Jay Miller wrote:
March 16th, 2018, 12:32 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:I would choose Sauvignon Blancs from all different regions. Be sure to taste them all before food is served. The taste of the food and even the smell of it will affect your perception of the wines. I'd also suggest a very low spice level or, if that doesn't sound good, maybe a different type of food like some sort of simple, citrusy seafood.
Very good advice. Tasting before and after is always very informative. Also agree on choosing low spice level dishes (such as pad thai) for this pairing.
I agree...I would definitely be tasting the wines before the food to see the difference the food has.

I think the ideas mentioned tasting Sauvignon Blanc from four different countries...it should be fun & informative.
Cellartracker:Kirk Grant

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Chris Blum
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#54 Post by Chris Blum » October 18th, 2020, 6:55 pm

For learning tastings, I like to set up obvious contrasts. So for Suav Blanc, I’d do lean citrus vs ripe tropical fruits and then maybe oak vs stainless? Or better yet...Loire vs New Zealand
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IlkkaL
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#55 Post by IlkkaL » October 18th, 2020, 10:31 pm

Jim Stewart wrote:
October 18th, 2020, 2:55 pm
IlkkaL wrote:
March 15th, 2018, 2:21 am
If you are looking for a number of drastically different Sancerres you could consider having the following:

A typical steel-fermented one from for example Boulay or F. Cotat
Alphonse Mellot Generation XIX (fairly big with some oak)
Sebastien Riffault Akméniné (the freaky end of the appellation)
Hey Ilkka , I'm replying to this old post of yours because tonight we opened an Alphonse Mellot La Moussiere Sancerre Blanc and the taste profile is very different from what I am used to in Sancerre Blanc. My previous many examples were uniformly marked by acid almost to the point of electricity sometimes, a citrus fruit profile, crisp and mineral. This La Moussiere is almost unrecognizable to me as a Sancerre: round versus crisp, muted acid, fruit profile to the riper almost sweet side and non-citrus to me. Also seemed to have some spiciness maybe from some oak. I was going to explain it by the vintage (this is a 2018) but I found your post looking for previous comments about Alphonse Mellot. I am now thinking maybe this is just a different style of Sancerre Blanc, that I have not experienced? Any thoughts? Thanks.

P.S. While this Sancerre is different from my previous experiences, I like this style and the wine "works" for me. I just have broadened my idea of Sancerre maybe.
Hi Jim,

First of all happy to hear you enjoyed it! Mellot's entry level Sancerre is not supposed to be anything as singular and atypically Sancerre as the Generation XIX but a comparison I have used is that I have found it to be to the average Sancerre what Raveneau is to the average Chablis. By this I mean that it has way more texture and a less pronounced varietal/appellational fruit character. However it needs to be said that I do have my worries when it comes to the 2018 vintage in many French regions and I think I will be personally focusing on more classic vintages when possible.
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Leonard Maran
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#56 Post by Leonard Maran » October 18th, 2020, 10:52 pm

I was in a tasting group for 15 years which met every month. Now, granted, this group had cheeses and bread. However we hated all Sauvignon Blanc tastings (and I like the variety) until members stopped showing up and we abandoned them.

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IlkkaL
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#57 Post by IlkkaL » October 19th, 2020, 1:17 am

Leonard Maran wrote:
October 18th, 2020, 10:52 pm
I was in a tasting group for 15 years which met every month. Now, granted, this group had cheeses and bread. However we hated all Sauvignon Blanc tastings (and I like the variety) until members stopped showing up and we abandoned them.
I don't blame you/them really. I like to drink Sauvignon with freshwater fish but generally speaking I don't think there is anything particularly interesting about the grape.
Last name = L u !V! !V! e

Nathan Smyth
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#58 Post by Nathan Smyth » October 19th, 2020, 2:01 am

Collin Dahl wrote:
March 14th, 2018, 7:38 pm
Northern Italy/Slovenia
From Slovenia, see if you can find "Villa Brici", by "Vinska Klet Goriska Brda".

And on the German side of things, you want to be prepared to walk over broken glass to procure a bottle of Von Winning's "Trocken II" Sauvignon Blanc.

If Brian Buzzini were to see this thread, then he would want you to throw in some obscure bottling of a Robert Mondavi "Fume Blanc" as a ringer.

Sadly, I don't know what to say about Vatan or Dagueneau these days - I don't run in those circles anymore [I wish I did, but I don't].

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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#59 Post by Robert Sand » October 19th, 2020, 3:56 am

grouphug
Collin Dahl wrote:
March 14th, 2018, 7:38 pm
If this is intended to be a fun learning experience for people who are interested in wine but might not have a lot of experience, then how about French, California, New Zealand and Northern Italy/Slovenia examples? Then people can decide what they like and don't like. There will be (should be...could be?) wild variations.
It would be a shame to have a Slovenian / Italian SB - and NO Austrian from Styria, some of the best world wide.

For Bordeaux I would opt for Pessac-Leognan only, and dry versions.

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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#60 Post by Chris Blum » October 19th, 2020, 7:22 am

IlkkaL wrote:
October 19th, 2020, 1:17 am
Leonard Maran wrote:
October 18th, 2020, 10:52 pm
I was in a tasting group for 15 years which met every month. Now, granted, this group had cheeses and bread. However we hated all Sauvignon Blanc tastings (and I like the variety) until members stopped showing up and we abandoned them.
I don't blame you/them really. I like to drink Sauvignon with freshwater fish but generally speaking I don't think there is anything particularly interesting about the grape.
Try well-aged Dagueneau and tell me it doesn’t change your opinion.
"Well, wine only turns into alcohol if you let it sit" -- Lucille Bluth
"The Packers f'n suck" -- Todd French

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IlkkaL
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Re: Ideas for Sauvigon Blanc tasting?

#61 Post by IlkkaL » October 19th, 2020, 8:06 am

Chris Blum wrote:
October 19th, 2020, 7:22 am
IlkkaL wrote:
October 19th, 2020, 1:17 am
Leonard Maran wrote:
October 18th, 2020, 10:52 pm
I was in a tasting group for 15 years which met every month. Now, granted, this group had cheeses and bread. However we hated all Sauvignon Blanc tastings (and I like the variety) until members stopped showing up and we abandoned them.
I don't blame you/them really. I like to drink Sauvignon with freshwater fish but generally speaking I don't think there is anything particularly interesting about the grape.
Try well-aged Dagueneau and tell me it doesn’t change your opinion.
I know there are great Sauvignons out there and I continue to buy for example Cotat every year as long as it remains relatively affordable. However just because there is a handful of producers putting out mind-blowing wines does not change my opinion that in general the variety is not particularly interesting, to me.
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