Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

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YLee
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Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#1 Post by YLee » December 28th, 2018, 3:36 pm

Here's a bit more challenging one.
I think pairing chinese, thai, japanese foods with red/white wines are easier than Korean foods.

Which wines do you recommend pairing with Korean foods but not Korean bbq.
Last edited by YLee on December 29th, 2018, 5:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Korean food matching (no korean bbq)

#2 Post by Mark Y » December 28th, 2018, 3:38 pm

Beer
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Re: Korean food matching (no korean bbq)

#3 Post by Cris Whetstone » December 28th, 2018, 4:29 pm

Mark Y wrote:
December 28th, 2018, 3:38 pm
Beer
You're brave.

Correct, but brave. [wink.gif]
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#4 Post by Mark Y » December 28th, 2018, 8:08 pm

Lol. I love Korean food. Have it often. I really don’t think wine works very well. When I visited Korea, no one there drank wine with meals. That has to tell you something.

To be really honest my favorite beverage pairing with Korean food is either hot or iced barley tea. Depending on how I’m feeling. Natural pairing like champagne and fried chicken!
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#5 Post by Nowell Karten » December 29th, 2018, 3:33 am

I'm sure there are historical reasons why wine-culture hasn't developed as much in Korea as it has in other Asian countries. However, I and my Korean girlfriend and her family have enjoyed Champagne, German Riesling, and even red Burgundy with Korean food. Of course, I enjoy Champagne, German Riesling, and red Burgundy with many foods.

In May, I posted this thread about an article by Jon Bonne titled ""Why Bibimbap with Beaujolais Is the New Normal."
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=151385
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#6 Post by Gary Schulte » December 29th, 2018, 5:35 am

My first thought was a gamay which could have a touch of fruitiness to play off any spicy flavors. Although it may be better for the Korean bbq meats.

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#7 Post by Mike Evans » December 29th, 2018, 6:24 am

At a fairly recent dinner, 1996 Becherelle (Chenin Blanc from Joly) and 1996 Druet Bourgeuil Vaumoreau paired very well with a range of dishes and were outstanding wines as well. A 2012 Marc Angeli La Lune Anjou Blanc also worked pretty well.

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#8 Post by Arnold Caplan » December 29th, 2018, 6:28 am

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#9 Post by Kirk.Grant » December 29th, 2018, 7:03 am

I lived in Korea for about 18 months in the early 2000's. I really miss their culture & food. Along with BBQ one of my favorite dishes was Soondubu Jjigae. It's a tofu stew that's pretty spicy. I've found German Spatlese & Kabinett to work well. I'd imagine off dry Chennin Blanc would work well also. For a red wine I'd lean more toward something really fruity like a Joseph Swan Zinfandel or something from Ridge.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#10 Post by G. Bienstock » December 29th, 2018, 8:52 am

Smooth tannin Aglianico works with beef.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#11 Post by DanielP » December 29th, 2018, 9:51 am

I will assume that your food will be some sort of stew, as most Korean food tends to be apart from a few exceptions like BBQ. If you happen to be eating some stir fry, that's relatively easy to match.

For stews, I'll usually tend toward off dry riesling, especially if there's good spice, but it's not always a great match. The stews are savory but often contain fermented elements. They're also not especially fatty, so I find that riesling's acidity can feel too sharp without fat to cut through. What ends up happening is that I'll just drink whatever I want to drink, pairing be damned, whether it's riesling, burg, or napa cab
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#12 Post by G. Keeler » December 29th, 2018, 10:17 am

It’s really hard to generalize with any cuisine because it can vary so much dish to dish. We did a Bo Ssam not to long ago and had both a champagne and dry riesling open. Both worked great but for me riesling and pork is always so good. My Korean mother in law makes Galbi Jjim that and can pair with all kinds of red wines you would normally pair with braised beef. For me, spicy food just kills any kind of red wine and makes both things taste worse. If we are eating Korean food with spice, we stick to soju or cold beer.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#13 Post by M. Meer » December 29th, 2018, 10:20 am

Jura with just about anything Asian pileon
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#14 Post by GregT » December 29th, 2018, 11:49 am

Again, hard to generalize. With the various kinds of kim chee? No wine at all. With BBQ red meats, many more. If there's a fermented soy component as a flavoring, sherries usually work really well. For me, if it's a pretty spicy dish, wine doesn't really work too well, unless it's kind of sweet.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#15 Post by Kris Patten » December 29th, 2018, 2:36 pm

Off dry Alsatian Pinot Gris, or any number of Sake depending on spice level. I'd also try Lambrusco slightly chilled.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#16 Post by lleichtman » December 29th, 2018, 3:25 pm

YLee wrote:
December 28th, 2018, 3:36 pm
Here's a bit more challenging one.
I think pairing chinese, thai, japanese foods with red/white wines are easier than Korean foods.

Which wines do you recommend pairing with Korean foods but not Korean bbq.
If it is Kimchee based, no wine goes with it. Have tried everything and nothing works. Would try Sake or Shochu.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#17 Post by YLee » December 29th, 2018, 3:36 pm

lleichtman wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 3:25 pm
YLee wrote:
December 28th, 2018, 3:36 pm
Here's a bit more challenging one.
I think pairing chinese, thai, japanese foods with red/white wines are easier than Korean foods.

Which wines do you recommend pairing with Korean foods but not Korean bbq.
If it is Kimchee based, no wine goes with it. Have tried everything and nothing works. Would try Sake or Shochu.
Soju?
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#18 Post by Markus S » December 29th, 2018, 5:09 pm

GregT wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 11:49 am
Again, hard to generalize. With the various kinds of kim chee? No wine at all.
Many kinds of kimchee out there, many seasonally based. Don't want to generalize. neener
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#19 Post by Sarah Kirschbaum » December 29th, 2018, 6:35 pm

The best match with Korean I ever had was a Kikuhime usu-nigori sake in ishobin, which even worked with kimchee. Of course, that's a mind-blowing sake regardless of pairing. Other options for us include off dry Riesling, Jura and other oxidative wines like sherry or madeira. Spice and sugar are challenges. Like Glenn, I can't put red wine with spicy food, almost across the board.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#20 Post by Craig G » December 29th, 2018, 6:41 pm

I would gladly try all sorts of wines with all sorts of foods, but too much spicy heat destroys my palate for wine, so it would have to depend on the level of heat. Some of the flavors, for example doenjang, might be very interesting with wines as long as the spice is in check.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#21 Post by Dale Williams » December 29th, 2018, 6:53 pm

Kirk.Grant wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 7:03 am
I lived in Korea for about 18 months in the early 2000's. I really miss their culture & food. Along with BBQ one of my favorite dishes was Soondubu Jjigae. It's a tofu stew that's pretty spicy. I've found German Spatlese & Kabinett to work well. I'd imagine off dry Chennin Blanc would work well also.
Those really hot dishes are hard for wine, and those I understand the folks that say beer or water. But I like to at least try wine, and with Ajujim (monkfish stew- spices similar to Soondubu Jjigae), I thought offdry Riesling worked best.

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#22 Post by YLee » December 29th, 2018, 6:57 pm

How about non spicy korean foods? Korean foods seem to get a reputation for being spicy but there are many non spicy foods as well. So what would you pair with those?
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#23 Post by lleichtman » December 30th, 2018, 9:28 am

YLee wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 3:36 pm
lleichtman wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 3:25 pm
YLee wrote:
December 28th, 2018, 3:36 pm
Here's a bit more challenging one.
I think pairing chinese, thai, japanese foods with red/white wines are easier than Korean foods.

Which wines do you recommend pairing with Korean foods but not Korean bbq.
If it is Kimchee based, no wine goes with it. Have tried everything and nothing works. Would try Sake or Shochu.
Soju?
Same thing. Japanese call it Shochu and Koreans call it Soju. Both are paint thinner to me.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#24 Post by YLee » December 30th, 2018, 12:07 pm

lleichtman wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 9:28 am
YLee wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 3:36 pm
lleichtman wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 3:25 pm


If it is Kimchee based, no wine goes with it. Have tried everything and nothing works. Would try Sake or Shochu.
Soju?
Same thing. Japanese call it Shochu and Koreans call it Soju. Both are paint thinner to me.
No. It's called Soju. You are not even Japanese. Maybe you need to stick to fruity cocktails with cute umbrellas.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#25 Post by lleichtman » December 30th, 2018, 12:19 pm

YLee wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 12:07 pm
lleichtman wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 9:28 am
YLee wrote:
December 29th, 2018, 3:36 pm


Soju?
Same thing. Japanese call it Shochu and Koreans call it Soju. Both are paint thinner to me.
No. It's called Soju. You are not even Japanese. Maybe you need to stick to fruity cocktails with cute umbrellas.
And the horse you rode in on. I've spent a lot of time in Japan and it's Shochu
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sh%C5%8Dch%C5%AB
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#26 Post by M. Meer » December 30th, 2018, 12:24 pm

lleichtman wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 9:28 am

Same thing. Japanese call it Shochu and Koreans call it Soju.
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soju
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#27 Post by YLee » December 30th, 2018, 12:32 pm

lleichtman wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 12:19 pm
YLee wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 12:07 pm
lleichtman wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 9:28 am


Same thing. Japanese call it Shochu and Koreans call it Soju. Both are paint thinner to me.
No. It's called Soju. You are not even Japanese. Maybe you need to stick to fruity cocktails with cute umbrellas.
And the horse you rode in on. I've spent a lot of time in Japan and it's Shochu
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sh%C5%8Dch%C5%AB
Apparently, you dont seem to understand Soju is a korean drink. You provided the evidence I needed. Thanks.

I'm happy you spent time in Japan. But I'm Korean.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#28 Post by YLee » December 30th, 2018, 12:33 pm

M. Meer wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 12:24 pm
lleichtman wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 9:28 am

Same thing. Japanese call it Shochu and Koreans call it Soju.
[wow.gif]
Duck!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soju
[thumbs-up.gif]
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#29 Post by Nate Simon » December 30th, 2018, 1:08 pm

I’ve never had a soju that I even remotely liked, though Koreans seem to drink it with meals at restaurants I frequent. There’s also a rice-based drink called makgeoli that hasn’t impressed me. Any brands anyone might recommend? Otherwise, a good dry sake might be just the thing.

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#30 Post by Edward H. Earles » December 30th, 2018, 5:39 pm

I love Korean food (my favorite cuisine), and when I'm cooking for myself only, that's all I cook. I don't even attempt to match wines. Take a tip from the Koreans....beer, or hot tea. Ginseng tea or ginger beer if you want to branch out.

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#31 Post by Juliec » January 9th, 2020, 10:07 pm

Great suggestions; some of the thread went off topic. To sum it up, reisling, chenin blanc,gv, beaujolais, some speciality sake and french suggestions, syrah and zin. I would probably add sonoma coast pn and chardonnays. Any other suggestions in burgundy or cab, etc? To pair with bbq and non bbq foods. Thks
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#32 Post by Curtis Chen » January 9th, 2020, 10:15 pm

You should be telling us. Bad Korean.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#33 Post by ERPark » January 10th, 2020, 12:34 am

This thread could’ve been tightened up from the get go if the different styles/types of Korean foods were addressed as something more definitive than “not BBQ”. Dduk mahndoo gook is not like koong nahmuhl gook. Jahpchae is not like nnehng myun. Haemuhl pahjun is not like yaki mahndoo. Kkalbi jjim is not like bo ssahm. Kkimchee jjigae with pork belly and potatoes is not like kkamjah tahng (another soup/stew with potatoes and pork). ***

Soju is to shochu as Southern Rhône is to Northern Rhône......i.e. they share some DNA/similarities, but they are really NOT the same. Or as they say often in Southeast Asia, “same same but different”.

Props to the posters who did call out specific dishes, and the pairings they’ve ostensibly tried with them.

For dinner tonight, we made a kkimchee jjigae with both soft and firm tofu, potatoes, pork belly and starting to get funky kkimchee. Paired it with a 2014 Thibault Liger-Belair Moulin a Vent gamay bojo. Worked very well together.

*** for anyone wondering what the double consonants mean, it connotes the sound having a “harder” emphasis/intonation. The kk will sound more like a G in “gallery” than a K in “okay”. Koreans pronounce it gim-chee, like the Gimp from “Pulp Fiction”. Also, most Westernized spellings invoking the A vowel will be pronounced more like “ah” than “eh”. Dumplings are pronounced mon-doo (not trying to emulate the idiot that is Tom Hanks’ failson Chet, but think “I was born in Jamaica, mon”) rather than man-doo.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#34 Post by Victor Hong » January 10th, 2020, 4:24 am

lleichtman wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 12:19 pm


And the horse you rode in on. I've spent a lot of time in Japan and it's Shochu
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sh%C5%8Dch%C5%AB
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#35 Post by Subu Ramachandran » January 10th, 2020, 5:57 am

From my humble experience,

Bdx, Barolo - Bulgogi (with mushrooms), Galbi have worked for me.
Red Burgundy, old rioja - Yukhoe, Kongguksu, Samgyetang (needs to be cooled down to room temp), Gyeran-jjim
Champagne - Kimbap, Hoe (sashimi) and most Guks
White Burgundy - Tteok-bokki, Japchae, Dak-kkochi

Korean cuisine is as diverse as western cuisine. What goes with Korean food, well same as what goes well with "western food".

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#36 Post by YLee » January 10th, 2020, 6:05 am

Interesting pairing for Tteok-bokki. I cant imagine it going well together but perhaps I will try it one day.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#37 Post by Markus S » January 10th, 2020, 6:08 am

Subu Ramachandran wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 5:57 am
From my humble experience,
Korean cuisine is as diverse as western cuisine.
Love Korean food but I really wouldn't say this.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#38 Post by Subu Ramachandran » January 10th, 2020, 6:26 am

YLee wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 6:05 am
Interesting pairing for Tteok-bokki. I cant imagine it going well together but perhaps I will try it one day.
The obvious pairing is a Riesling. I'm giving other substitutes that have worked. For Tteok-bokki, go for richer style White Burg.

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#39 Post by Subu Ramachandran » January 10th, 2020, 6:39 am

Markus S wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 6:08 am
Subu Ramachandran wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 5:57 am
From my humble experience,
Korean cuisine is as diverse as western cuisine.
Love Korean food but I really wouldn't say this.
I'm neither Korean nor knew much beyond BBQ/ few dishes; but have discovered a lot. They use all types of meat in a various form of cooking (grill, steam, raw, boiled...). Of course, the ingredients/ condiments are different to western, but it is as varied if not more. Just need an open mind Markus :)

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#40 Post by Juliec » January 10th, 2020, 7:03 am

Thanks ER and Subu! Along with others with specific even to the french producers name. Really insightful. Definitely in kr you will only see soju since it's easy and flavorless or light fruit.

In the interest in sharing I have found loire les ongles in chenin blanc as well as any chenin blanc to work well. Especially with fusion korean restaurants. Aged dry, acidic pn and chardonnay seemed to work well too. I had aged peay recently and it was fantastic. Pn with meat and main dishes. Chard with veggie and fish. I'm going to try the peay syrah, moulin a Vent, chablis and maybe peay pn for a bbq dinner with family. Thank for suggestion will look to add try to source some of the others next time.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#41 Post by Markus S » January 10th, 2020, 10:24 am

Subu Ramachandran wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 6:39 am
Markus S wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 6:08 am
Subu Ramachandran wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 5:57 am
From my humble experience,
Korean cuisine is as diverse as western cuisine.
Love Korean food but I really wouldn't say this.
I'm neither Korean nor knew much beyond BBQ/ few dishes; but have discovered a lot. They use all types of meat in a various form of cooking (grill, steam, raw, boiled...). Of course, the ingredients/ condiments are different to western, but it is as varied if not more. Just need an open mind Markus :)
Oh I have an open mind alright but I would not say Korean food has as many cooking styles as nearby China or India, and in terms of western cooking, there really isn't any baking. You have to understand the Korean peninsula is not that large an area (about the size of Idaho) and above a latitude where a lot of things simply don't grow: this limits what they have to work with (compare with China which has semi-tropical and northerly climates).
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#42 Post by YLee » January 10th, 2020, 10:36 am

Markus S wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:24 am
Subu Ramachandran wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 6:39 am
Markus S wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 6:08 am


Love Korean food but I really wouldn't say this.
I'm neither Korean nor knew much beyond BBQ/ few dishes; but have discovered a lot. They use all types of meat in a various form of cooking (grill, steam, raw, boiled...). Of course, the ingredients/ condiments are different to western, but it is as varied if not more. Just need an open mind Markus :)
Oh I have an open mind alright but I would not say Korean food has as many cooking styles as nearby China or India, and in terms of western cooking, there really isn't any baking. You have to understand the Korean peninsula is not that large an area (about the size of Idaho) and above a latitude where a lot of things simply don't grow: this limits what they have to work with (compare with China which has semi-tropical and northerly climates).
I have to disagree with this. First, Indian food isn't very diverse. Korean foods that pretty much most non-koreans know about has so much diversity. Some Chinese food is similar to Korean and many Japanese to Korean as well.
Korean do not eat only Kimchi, bbq, bibbimbap, pancakes, etc. What you find in many Korean restaurants are an extremely small display of Korean cuisine as a whole.
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#43 Post by Mich@el Ch@ng » January 10th, 2020, 10:46 am

YLee wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:36 am
Markus S wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:24 am
Subu Ramachandran wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 6:39 am


I'm neither Korean nor knew much beyond BBQ/ few dishes; but have discovered a lot. They use all types of meat in a various form of cooking (grill, steam, raw, boiled...). Of course, the ingredients/ condiments are different to western, but it is as varied if not more. Just need an open mind Markus :)
Oh I have an open mind alright but I would not say Korean food has as many cooking styles as nearby China or India, and in terms of western cooking, there really isn't any baking. You have to understand the Korean peninsula is not that large an area (about the size of Idaho) and above a latitude where a lot of things simply don't grow: this limits what they have to work with (compare with China which has semi-tropical and northerly climates).
I have to disagree with this. First, Indian food isn't very diverse. Korean foods that pretty much most non-koreans know about has so much diversity. Some Chinese food is similar to Korean and many Japanese to Korean as well.
Korean do not eat only Kimchi, bbq, bibbimbap, pancakes, etc. What you find in many Korean restaurants are an extremely small display of Korean cuisine as a whole.
That's a pretty silly argument. Indian food is much more diverse than Korean food, which is not to say that Korean food isn't diverse. India is a much more hetereogenous country than Korea with far more diverse ethnic groups under the same umbrella of a country where as >95% of ppl in Korea are ethnically Korean. Not to mention that India has 30 times the population of South Korea. The vast majority of Indian food isn't available in the US, whereas I would argue that most (if not all) Korean cuisines are available in los angeles or new york. While you could make the argument that non-Koreans are exposed to a relatively small subset of available Korean foods, it isn't anywhere close to the paucity of Indian cuisine avaialble in the US. Chinese cuisine is sort of similar although there is a longer history of Chinese restaurants in the US so there is a greater variety of Chinese food available than many other ethnic cuisines.

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GregT
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#44 Post by GregT » January 10th, 2020, 11:00 am

I love that a two year old thread from the dumpster can continue arguments as if there had been no hiatus.

And then:
First, Indian food isn't very diverse.
Really? It's actually extremely diverse. The problem is that people refer to the entire subcontinent as if it were a single, unified place. It's a bit like referring to "European" cuisine and imagining that there's so much in common between the foods of Latvia and those of Sicily. India has a number of different regional cuisines that have been influenced by mountains and tropics, by various religions, and by Arabs, Europeans, Mongols, Chinese, and other invaders/traders. In some areas they use more milk products, in others more fish, in some regions wheat, in other regions rice, in some regions coconuts, in others vinegars, etc.

As to pairings with Korean food, I just give up on it and drink what I like and eat what I like. If the food is good and the wine is good, that's sufficient. Pretty much how I pair anything.
G . T a t a r

[i]"the incorrect overuse of apostrophes is staggering these days. I wonder if half the adults these days have any idea what they are for." Chris Seiber, 5/14/19[/i]

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GregT
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#45 Post by GregT » January 10th, 2020, 11:02 am

Whoops. Writing while Michael was posting. Making the same point though. [cheers.gif]
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YLee
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#46 Post by YLee » January 10th, 2020, 11:16 am

Mich@el Ch@ng wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:46 am
YLee wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:36 am
Markus S wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:24 am


Oh I have an open mind alright but I would not say Korean food has as many cooking styles as nearby China or India, and in terms of western cooking, there really isn't any baking. You have to understand the Korean peninsula is not that large an area (about the size of Idaho) and above a latitude where a lot of things simply don't grow: this limits what they have to work with (compare with China which has semi-tropical and northerly climates).
I have to disagree with this. First, Indian food isn't very diverse. Korean foods that pretty much most non-koreans know about has so much diversity. Some Chinese food is similar to Korean and many Japanese to Korean as well.
Korean do not eat only Kimchi, bbq, bibbimbap, pancakes, etc. What you find in many Korean restaurants are an extremely small display of Korean cuisine as a whole.
That's a pretty silly argument. Indian food is much more diverse than Korean food, which is not to say that Korean food isn't diverse. India is a much more hetereogenous country than Korea with far more diverse ethnic groups under the same umbrella of a country where as >95% of ppl in Korea are ethnically Korean. Not to mention that India has 30 times the population of South Korea. The vast majority of Indian food isn't available in the US, whereas I would argue that most (if not all) Korean cuisines are available in los angeles or new york. While you could make the argument that non-Koreans are exposed to a relatively small subset of available Korean foods, it isn't anywhere close to the paucity of Indian cuisine avaialble in the US. Chinese cuisine is sort of similar although there is a longer history of Chinese restaurants in the US so there is a greater variety of Chinese food available than many other ethnic cuisines.
Diverse ethnic group doesnt make it Indian food. Thats saying Chinese food in America is American food. Lol
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#47 Post by Mich@el Ch@ng » January 10th, 2020, 11:34 am

YLee wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 11:16 am
Mich@el Ch@ng wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:46 am
YLee wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:36 am


I have to disagree with this. First, Indian food isn't very diverse. Korean foods that pretty much most non-koreans know about has so much diversity. Some Chinese food is similar to Korean and many Japanese to Korean as well.
Korean do not eat only Kimchi, bbq, bibbimbap, pancakes, etc. What you find in many Korean restaurants are an extremely small display of Korean cuisine as a whole.
That's a pretty silly argument. Indian food is much more diverse than Korean food, which is not to say that Korean food isn't diverse. India is a much more hetereogenous country than Korea with far more diverse ethnic groups under the same umbrella of a country where as >95% of ppl in Korea are ethnically Korean. Not to mention that India has 30 times the population of South Korea. The vast majority of Indian food isn't available in the US, whereas I would argue that most (if not all) Korean cuisines are available in los angeles or new york. While you could make the argument that non-Koreans are exposed to a relatively small subset of available Korean foods, it isn't anywhere close to the paucity of Indian cuisine avaialble in the US. Chinese cuisine is sort of similar although there is a longer history of Chinese restaurants in the US so there is a greater variety of Chinese food available than many other ethnic cuisines.
Diverse ethnic group doesnt make it Indian food. Thats saying Chinese food in America is American food. Lol
Indian food is far more diverse; at least one reason is because a huge subset of it is vegetarian, while other huge portions are not. If you look at say Gujarati food vs Malayali food vs Bengali Muslim cuisine you might not even think they’re at all related.

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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#48 Post by YLee » January 10th, 2020, 11:48 am

GregT wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 11:00 am
I love that a two year old thread from the dumpster can continue arguments as if there had been no hiatus.

And then:
First, Indian food isn't very diverse.
Really? It's actually extremely diverse. The problem is that people refer to the entire subcontinent as if it were a single, unified place. It's a bit like referring to "European" cuisine and imagining that there's so much in common between the foods of Latvia and those of Sicily. India has a number of different regional cuisines that have been influenced by mountains and tropics, by various religions, and by Arabs, Europeans, Mongols, Chinese, and other invaders/traders. In some areas they use more milk products, in others more fish, in some regions wheat, in other regions rice, in some regions coconuts, in others vinegars, etc.

As to pairings with Korean food, I just give up on it and drink what I like and eat what I like. If the food is good and the wine is good, that's sufficient. Pretty much how I pair anything.
Do you find any disagreements to be arguments in life? We are having a discussion. Relax man. Go drink a bottle of wine.
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YLee
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#49 Post by YLee » January 10th, 2020, 12:28 pm

Mich@el Ch@ng wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 11:34 am
YLee wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 11:16 am
Mich@el Ch@ng wrote:
January 10th, 2020, 10:46 am


That's a pretty silly argument. Indian food is much more diverse than Korean food, which is not to say that Korean food isn't diverse. India is a much more hetereogenous country than Korea with far more diverse ethnic groups under the same umbrella of a country where as >95% of ppl in Korea are ethnically Korean. Not to mention that India has 30 times the population of South Korea. The vast majority of Indian food isn't available in the US, whereas I would argue that most (if not all) Korean cuisines are available in los angeles or new york. While you could make the argument that non-Koreans are exposed to a relatively small subset of available Korean foods, it isn't anywhere close to the paucity of Indian cuisine avaialble in the US. Chinese cuisine is sort of similar although there is a longer history of Chinese restaurants in the US so there is a greater variety of Chinese food available than many other ethnic cuisines.
Diverse ethnic group doesnt make it Indian food. Thats saying Chinese food in America is American food. Lol
Indian food is far more diverse; at least one reason is because a huge subset of it is vegetarian, while other huge portions are not. If you look at say Gujarati food vs Malayali food vs Bengali Muslim cuisine you might not even think they’re at all related.
Good to know. Now I'm going to blame all of my Indian friends including my best friend as to why they only introduce me to chicken vindaloo lol
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Re: Korean food matching (not korean bbq)

#50 Post by ERPark » January 10th, 2020, 12:51 pm

OK, children. Let’s get our focus back!

Wife and I made galbi jjim for lunch today. Boneless short ribs, turnip, potato, carrot, whole garlic, mushroom, red onion, red bell pepper and boiled egg simmered in a soy sauce/mirin/sugar/water broth for a bit over an hour, then garnished with slivered bell pepper and green onion (forgot to chop up some cilantro). Key thing is when to add the various veggies, as you don’t want to overcook them, in particular the potato. Serve over rice, our preference being cold rice with stew ladled over it, so rice stays a little firm.

A variety of red wines work fine with this, as it’s got richness from the short rib fat and tendon along with some sweetness. We shared the one glass worth remaining of the 2013 (not ‘14, like I said upthread) TLB Moulin à Vent Les Vielles Vignes, then popped a 2015 Domaine Aléofane Crozes Hermitage. Certainly would also try Italian like a Barbera d’Asti, as well.

Life isn’t bad, to say the least!

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