Wine And A-Fib?

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Greg D
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Wine And A-Fib?

#1 Post by Greg D » June 28th, 2019, 1:55 pm

Wondering if anyone has experience with wine/alcohol consumption and onset of A-fib/flutter?

LONG story short, I've been a high intensity endurance athlete (cycling) for 20 years. Used to race but not anymore. But still enjoy riding fast in group or solo rides where I push my heart rate to threshold and keep it there for a while. At least I used to until 6 months ago when I started showing symptoms of A-fib. Both at random times AND while pushing my HR up on the bike (flutter).

I've also been a regular/daily consumer of wine and beer for 30 ish years. Never to excess but moderate amounts.

I've learned that it is becoming common for older (50/60's) high intensity endurance athletes to develop A-fib. But I've also read that alcohol and coffee consumption are risk factors or triggers. So while it could be that my exercising caused the A-fib to start up. But also possibly the alcohol consumption? Anyone have experience or thoughts on this?

My symptoms got bad enough, and weren't responding too well to medication, that I had an ablation done about 4 weeks ago. So far the A-fib has stopped, so that's good news, but they say it really takes 3-6 months for the heart to settle down after the procedure to properly evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure.

Thanks, Greg
Last edited by Greg D on June 28th, 2019, 2:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#2 Post by GregT » June 28th, 2019, 1:59 pm

Sounds terrible. I hope you're going to be OK.

And seriously, if I had a problem with a-fib from wine, I'd completely cut out wine. In your case it sounds like you may be having an argument with Father Time, although you say it happens both when you exert yourself and when you don't.

No advice here but all the best to you with that. It's scary stuff. Take care.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#3 Post by Tom G l a s g o w » June 28th, 2019, 2:08 pm

Bobby better be careful.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#4 Post by Glen Gold » June 28th, 2019, 2:19 pm

I had catheter ablation for the same thing, but I'd hesitate before offering you much advice. SVTs are like Parkinson's symptoms -- they can mean different things for different people. However I can tell you this, which no one else told me -- my symptoms are closely correlated with dehydration. I have only had a couple of episodes since they burned out a little piece of my heart (what a metaphor), but each time it was because I hadn't had enough water. I now drink 1/2 my body weight in ounces on the days I don't exercise, and more as needed on the other days, and my symptoms have pretty much vanished. I have a feeling that though there are other ways alcohol and coffe might impact this, the dehydration effect is pretty big.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#5 Post by Paul Miller » June 28th, 2019, 2:25 pm


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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#6 Post by Steve Manzi » June 28th, 2019, 2:27 pm

Glen Gold wrote:
June 28th, 2019, 2:19 pm
I had catheter ablation for the same thing, but I'd hesitate before offering you much advice. SVTs are like Parkinson's symptoms -- they can mean different things for different people. However I can tell you this, which no one else told me -- my symptoms are closely correlated with dehydration. I have only had a couple of episodes since they burned out a little piece of my heart (what a metaphor), but each time it was because I hadn't had enough water. I now drink 1/2 my body weight in ounces on the days I don't exercise, and more as needed on the other days, and my symptoms have pretty much vanished. I have a feeling that though there are other ways alcohol and coffe might impact this, the dehydration effect is pretty big.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#7 Post by Greg D » June 28th, 2019, 2:54 pm

Thanks all!

Interesting about the dehydration angle. I've always been guilty of not drinking enough water so I've been trying to correct that. I also read about being deficient in potassium and/or magnesium can cause the fib. So I've been experimenting with supplementing them.
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#8 Post by Steve Gautier » June 28th, 2019, 4:42 pm

Glen Gold wrote:
June 28th, 2019, 2:19 pm
I had catheter ablation for the same thing, but I'd hesitate before offering you much advice. SVTs are like Parkinson's symptoms -- they can mean different things for different people. However I can tell you this, which no one else told me -- my symptoms are closely correlated with dehydration. I have only had a couple of episodes since they burned out a little piece of my heart (what a metaphor), but each time it was because I hadn't had enough water. I now drink 1/2 my body weight in ounces on the days I don't exercise, and more as needed on the other days, and my symptoms have pretty much vanished. I have a feeling that though there are other ways alcohol and coffe might impact this, the dehydration effect is pretty big.

G
It is so hard to determine which of the many afib triggers cause an episode but I do believe that dehydration has been associated with most but not all of my episodes.
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#9 Post by Barry L i p t o n » June 28th, 2019, 5:00 pm

Wine can definitely trigger a fib. 1-2 glasses is usually ok but some are very sensitive and smaller amounts will trigger it.

Also, good not to have it multiple days running.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#10 Post by Randy Bowman » June 28th, 2019, 7:39 pm

Have a friend, (64 yrs old), who has had two catheter ablations. The first one didn't solve it and so far it appears the second one was successful. I know he doesn't stay hydrated, drinks a fair amount, mostly Seagrams Seven and wine with some dinners or after our weekly golf outing. He has cut out basketball, but still bowls and golfs.
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#11 Post by Anton D » June 28th, 2019, 9:19 pm

Ideally, we’d have echocardiograms at age 21 and then later to track changes in the size of our atriums over time.

Many interesting correlations to A FIB.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#12 Post by john stimson » June 28th, 2019, 9:44 pm

Greg--there's a long history of connection with alcohol consumption and afib. But you are a special case as a high performance athlete, and by bringing on your afib with extreme exertion. As I suspect you are aware, there are things that can happen cardiac-wise in older high performance athletes. I'm a general internist, so can't really give you high level specialty advice. I would be sure that you are hooked up with a good cardiologist and electrophysiologist, which I'm sure you likely are if you've had an ablation. whether alcohol has much to do with your trouble or not is not possible to sort out on a wine board. It might have very little to do with things, or could be a significant trigger.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#13 Post by J.Durham » June 29th, 2019, 6:26 am

Clear link between alcohol consumption and Afib. Some studies show even light drinkers have increased risk. Also clear link with endurance athletes and Afib. Atrial flutter is a completely different animal and while it shares some risk factors with Afib (anything that causes atrial remodeling) is treated differently and responds better to ablation. Id talk to you EP about alcohol consumption. He/she may have some recommendations based on your symptoms and the degree of atrial remodeling. They will have your echo data and probably a 3D map from your ablation to inform decisions. Sorry, can’t really generalize as this is a patient level recommendation.
Also consider sleep apnea screening given link with alcohol consumption (even if not overweight)
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#14 Post by dcornutt » June 29th, 2019, 8:22 am

J.Durham wrote:
June 29th, 2019, 6:26 am
Clear link between alcohol consumption and Afib. Some studies show even light drinkers have increased risk. Also clear link with endurance athletes and Afib. Atrial flutter is a completely different animal and while it shares some risk factors with Afib (anything that causes atrial remodeling) is treated differently and responds better to ablation. Id talk to you EP about alcohol consumption. He/she may have some recommendations based on your symptoms and the degree of atrial remodeling. They will have your echo data and probably a 3D map from your ablation to inform decisions. Sorry, can’t really generalize as this is a patient level recommendation.
Also consider sleep apnea screening given link with alcohol consumption (even if not overweight)
This one. I will second and third this suggestion!
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#15 Post by Brian Crabtree » June 29th, 2019, 6:15 pm

It is a complex issue. I was diagnosed with afib in Feb 2018. I've had two catheter ablations, most recently Mar 11, 2019. I abstained completely from alcohol for a full 3 months after the ablation, which is the duration of a typical post-ablation inflammation recovery period. I've also done a great deal of reading from the cardiology research literature and would be glad to send you some papers via private mail. Key points are as follows:

1. If you limit your alcohol consumption to seven or fewer 12 gm servings per week, your risk of recurrent afib is not significantly different than a non-drinker. Risk of recurrence goes up if you consume more alcohol. At a "moderate" level of more than 8 servings but less than 21 servings, the risk of recurrent afib is around 30-35%. Keep in mind that minimizing risk of afib is important to prevent progression to persistent (essentially continuous) afib.
2. Twelve grams of alcohol is about 4 ounces of 13.0% abv wine (120 ml x 0.13 = 15.6 ml alcohol; 15.6 x specific gravity of 0.8 = 12.48 gms alcohol).
3. There is no established safe level of everyday consumption of alcohol at any volume.

The approach I'm taking, also in consultation with my EP cardiologist, is to limit my consumption to 6 ounces on non-consecutive days. Six ounces would be about 18 gms of alcohol, more or less, so about 1.5 servings of alcohol. If I consume 6 oz no more than four times in a week, that would be 6 servings, which keeps me within that 7 servings limit and no consecutive days consumption. Like many here on the board, my previous pattern of wine drinking was to share most or all of a bottle with my wife most days, so this is a new relationship with wine for me. I will simply say this: I found afib to be extremely uncomfortable, stressful, anxiety-provoking, and unacceptable if I have a choice. My episodes were up to 18 hours in duration and had one episode of 6 days. Sometimes I could barely get off the couch. I was instructed to avoid driving when in afib because of near fainting episodes. I've been electrically cardioverted and have had two ablations. I'm doing well since the second ablation and still on a rhythm control drug and a blood thinner … no afib, good BP, exercising with no problem, and consuming wine as described. For me, my old pattern of wine consumption is just not worth the risk. Overall health and quality of life is the bottom line. The standard disqualifier is that every patient is a unique individual.

I agree with comments about minimizing risk factors, including an evaluation for sleep apnea.
Best wishes for good recovery following ablation, symptom-free remission, and high quality of life with exercise and healthful wine consumption.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#16 Post by Tom G l a s g o w » June 30th, 2019, 6:25 am

Brian Crabtree wrote:
June 29th, 2019, 6:15 pm
It is a complex issue. I was diagnosed with afib in Feb 2018. I've had two catheter ablations, most recently Mar 11, 2019. I abstained completely from alcohol for a full 3 months after the ablation, which is the duration of a typical post-ablation inflammation recovery period. I've also done a great deal of reading from the cardiology research literature and would be glad to send you some papers via private mail. Key points are as follows:

1. If you limit your alcohol consumption to seven or fewer 12 gm servings per week, your risk of recurrent afib is not significantly different than a non-drinker. Risk of recurrence goes up if you consume more alcohol. At a "moderate" level of more than 8 servings but less than 21 servings, the risk of recurrent afib is around 30-35%. Keep in mind that minimizing risk of afib is important to prevent progression to persistent (essentially continuous) afib.
2. Twelve grams of alcohol is about 4 ounces of 13.0% abv wine (120 ml x 0.13 = 15.6 ml alcohol; 15.6 x specific gravity of 0.8 = 12.48 gms alcohol).
3. There is no established safe level of everyday consumption of alcohol at any volume.

The approach I'm taking, also in consultation with my EP cardiologist, is to limit my consumption to 6 ounces on non-consecutive days. Six ounces would be about 18 gms of alcohol, more or less, so about 1.5 servings of alcohol. If I consume 6 oz no more than four times in a week, that would be 6 servings, which keeps me within that 7 servings limit and no consecutive days consumption. Like many here on the board, my previous pattern of wine drinking was to share most or all of a bottle with my wife most days, so this is a new relationship with wine for me. I will simply say this: I found afib to be extremely uncomfortable, stressful, anxiety-provoking, and unacceptable if I have a choice. My episodes were up to 18 hours in duration and had one episode of 6 days. Sometimes I could barely get off the couch. I was instructed to avoid driving when in afib because of near fainting episodes. I've been electrically cardioverted and have had two ablations. I'm doing well since the second ablation and still on a rhythm control drug and a blood thinner … no afib, good BP, exercising with no problem, and consuming wine as described. For me, my old pattern of wine consumption is just not worth the risk. Overall health and quality of life is the bottom line. The standard disqualifier is that every patient is a unique individual.

I agree with comments about minimizing risk factors, including an evaluation for sleep apnea.
Best wishes for good recovery following ablation, symptom-free remission, and high quality of life with exercise and healthful wine consumption.
Glad to hear you’re doing well and thanks for sharing.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#17 Post by Barry L i p t o n » June 30th, 2019, 8:21 am

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#18 Post by R M Kriete » June 30th, 2019, 11:05 am

"Also clear link with endurance athletes and Afib. "

Finally, my laziness pays off.....normal sinus rhythm baby! [dance-clap.gif]

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#19 Post by Nico P. » January 24th, 2020, 8:11 am

Greg D wrote:
June 28th, 2019, 1:55 pm
Wondering if anyone has experience with wine/alcohol consumption and onset of A-fib/flutter?

LONG story short, I've been a high intensity endurance athlete (cycling) for 20 years. Used to race but not anymore. But still enjoy riding fast in group or solo rides where I push my heart rate to threshold and keep it there for a while. At least I used to until 6 months ago when I started showing symptoms of A-fib. Both at random times AND while pushing my HR up on the bike (flutter).

I've also been a regular/daily consumer of wine and beer for 30 ish years. Never to excess but moderate amounts.

I've learned that it is becoming common for older (50/60's) high intensity endurance athletes to develop A-fib. But I've also read that alcohol and coffee consumption are risk factors or triggers. So while it could be that my exercising caused the A-fib to start up. But also possibly the alcohol consumption? Anyone have experience or thoughts on this?

My symptoms got bad enough, and weren't responding too well to medication, that I had an ablation done about 4 weeks ago. So far the A-fib has stopped, so that's good news, but they say it really takes 3-6 months for the heart to settle down after the procedure to properly evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure.

Thanks, Greg
I hope your procedure was effective.

I read a book almost two years ago titled “The Haywire Heart” that makes a compelling case that too much endurance exercise can lead to arrhythmias, like afib.



Mandrola, the author of that book, also believes alcohol consumption is a risk factor for afib, with a linear dose response relationship, though he thinks caffeine doesn’t have the same triggering effect as alcohol.

Some persons can go their whole life drinking prodigious amounts of alcohol and never skip a beat. Others drink only moderately and still end up in the ER waiting for cardioversion. But whatever it is that got one into afib, they say afib begets afib - the heart can start remodeling itself in a way that makes it more prone to arrhythmia.

I think an ablation procedure is like a band aid or suture that, if successful, by stopping in the near term afib episodes, can allow a breathing space for the heart to recover and on its own reverse the electrical remodeling that facilitates the afib. I think whatever factors cause the remodeling do so gradually over a period of time (the biggest overall risk factor for afib is age), so it stands to reason a similar period of time is needed to return the heart to a less afib prone state. But if the same factors that precipitated the afib continue to exist, it’s probably only a matter of time before another ablation would be needed.

After my ablation, and after the washout period, I had no symptoms for close to six years. I got complacent. Then an episode was my wake up call that I shouldn’t take being in sinus rhythm for granted. While wine wasn’t the precipitating factor for that recurrence (it was probably a confluence of stress, not enough sleep, and you guessed it too much exercise on my bike) once that happened I noticed a few days straight of more than two to three glasses of wine would cause me to suffer skipped beats (PACs). I had to learn to pay attention to what my body was telling me and adjust my wine and beer consumption accordingly.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#20 Post by Kim Z » January 24th, 2020, 9:12 am

If it were me it would be time to give it up [cheers.gif]

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#21 Post by Dennis Borczon » January 24th, 2020, 10:12 am

I am there in the same category. Formerly heavy duty tennis/basketball player in my youth and now frequent bike rider (bad knees guy). Had episodic bouts of atrial tachycardia in my youth that were fairly well controlled with stopping all caffeine and lowering stress levels. As age creeps on started to get episodes at night that are linked with mild sleep apnea. I take a med to cut down on episodes, and treatment with C-pap helped a lot! Got an ablation 2 yrs ago and this was helpful.

Definitely I notice an association with excessive alcohol "binge" and increased episodes of flutter. I desperately hope that mild/moderate wine consumption does not increase the symptoms, or else i will have a very substantial wine collection to sell! Life without wine is a depressing future for me, but the above poster is quite correct when he states that you have to listen to your body. The article is somewhat reassuring in that there is an unclear relationship to light/moderate alcohol consumption on a regular basis and the symptoms of a-fib. The research is really not conclusive at this point due to a variety of confounding factors and that the underlying pathophysiology of the condition is not completely understood. "Remodeling" of heart function is an interesting topic in itself. Good luck with your recovery, it sure does suck getting older....

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#22 Post by Barry L i p t o n » January 24th, 2020, 12:00 pm

This article makes stronger statements about the link between at least 15 glasses/week (below binge) and afib.

Would have appreciated a group that covered moderate but excluded binge.

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1817591

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#23 Post by Dennis Borczon » January 24th, 2020, 1:12 pm

Interesting. This group studied was actually pretty symptomatic at baseline and I suppose it is not surprising that a large decrease in alcohol compared to control would result in some improvement in a-fib (as alcohol is a known contributor to the condition). Still even the abstinence group was having some significant symptoms despite abstinence. Tough study to do but the better question is does mild alcohol usage destabilize or worsen controlled a-fib symptoms significantly over time. Good research paper to pursue as this is really what most of us who occasionally indulge want to know....

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#24 Post by Todd F r e n c h » May 22nd, 2020, 7:56 am

I dug this up as I'm headed to get an ablation on Tuesday. I'm not (and haven't been) a high intensity endurance athlete, yet I am active and stay in shape. I eat well, have no sleep apnea, and no other of the underlying causes of a-fib (also have atrial flutter) other than prehypertension. My dad has a-fib 85% of the time, but his is less intense, and he never feels it, whereas mine is more intense, and I always feel it. I have zero interest in being medicated for the next 40 years or so, and sometimes when the a-fib/a-flutter flares up (like two weeks ago) it's outright painful for my heart.

As for alcohol consumption, I haven't notice any difference in days where I've not had a drink for consecutive days versus those where I have, but I know medical journals love to blame everything on smoking and alcohol :)

I'm confident in the safety of the procedure, but it does suck getting old, and having to do stuff like this!
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#25 Post by Siun o'Connell » May 22nd, 2020, 9:02 am

Good luck Todd! Lots of friends have had ablations and been pleased with results.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#26 Post by alan weinberg » May 22nd, 2020, 12:11 pm

good luck, Todd. Ablation is so cool compared to a lifetime of issues and anticoagulation. I’d jump at doing it if I had AF.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#27 Post by Dennis Atick » May 22nd, 2020, 12:17 pm

Good luck, Todd. I am in a similar boat, including the diet and sleep not being issues. My episodes have not yet been acute or consistent enough to go the next step to the ablation. However, two weeks I had a day that really sucked and I assume that at some point as I get older that I will have to take a next step.

Interested to hear how it goes and perhaps I will shoot you an email next week.
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#28 Post by Pete Lawley » May 22nd, 2020, 1:29 pm

Todd- after five episodes of A-flutter over four years, I finally had an ablation (actually two as the ‘faulty circuit’ grew back after the first one). Both were a piece of cake. I should have had one early on if I knew then what I know now.

When A- flutter occurred, it was always at night and meant a long night in the ER followed always by a cardio version. Ablation was outpatient, in at 7:00am, home by late afternoon. No after effects.

Best wishes! I understand some pre procedure anxiety, but I’m sure you’ll be pleasantly surprised. You’re doing the right thing IMHO.
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#29 Post by Todd F r e n c h » May 22nd, 2020, 1:37 pm

Thanks, all! Nice to read all this right before the procedure.

Pete, how bad was your a-flutter? You had to go to the ER? That's incredible! Mine goes to 180 ish without intense exercise, and has gone over 200 multiple times during intense exercise (which is why I stopped that)

My doctor was vetted by our own resident Electrophysiologist Joe Wu, and because mine is of the version that is unexplained or not as a result of an underlying condition, he's going to ablate all four veins on the right side, and do the left side as well. (both sides because flutter and fib are different sides of the heart, most of the time, or something like that)
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#30 Post by Pete Lawley » May 22nd, 2020, 2:00 pm

Todd- my flutter was about the same as you described yours. I always went to the ER bc for whatever reason, mine always came on late at night. I just couldn’t lie around waiting for daylight to contact my cardio doc. The flutter freaked me out! I could feel my rapid heart rate and no way I could sleep with it racing like it did. No pain or any other symptoms, but I hated that racing feeling.

After the first couple of instances I knew that drugs weren’t going to correct it. Always ended w cardio version. So off to the ER to get zapped.
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#31 Post by Todd F r e n c h » May 27th, 2020, 1:15 pm

Had my ablation yesterday and was able to leave the hospital at 8pm so I didn't have to stay overnight (whew!)

Only side effects thus far (today, day after) are related to the intubation, I think. The wounds on both legs are holding up, taking off the bandages tonight, as directed
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#32 Post by Mike Maguire » May 27th, 2020, 1:50 pm

Good to hear, continued good health and recovery.

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Pete Lawley
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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#33 Post by Pete Lawley » May 27th, 2020, 3:06 pm

Wonderful news, Todd! I hope it solves the issue.

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Pete

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#34 Post by NED VALOIS » May 27th, 2020, 3:31 pm

Todd,
Be well !
Ned

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#35 Post by markjchambers » May 27th, 2020, 7:58 pm

I assume you are talking about a sore throat from the intubation. Not uncommon, but it should be self-limiting.

This is an interesting thread, but I think trying to connect atrial fibrillation to drinking x number of glasses of wine per week is way over simplifying things. Heart disease is very complex and depends on dozens of factors. Moderate wine consumption by itself does not cause atrial fibrillation. There's no one thing that does. Excessive alcohol consumption is very bad for your heart. Jim Morrison died from alcoholic cardiomyopathy at age 29. But that's a lot of drinking for a lot of years. Moderate consumption, especially of red wine, may reduce the incident of coronary artery disease and CAD is one of the major causes of a fib.

If you have a fib, from whatever cause, that is a different story. If you get back into sinus rhythm, via cardioversion or ablation, you will always be at risk for flipping back into a fib. Caffeine is a stimulant so its a risk for sure, but I would like to see the any literature that says a glass or two of wine with dinner puts you at significant risk for a relapse.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#36 Post by MitchTallan » May 28th, 2020, 5:51 am

I had not noticed this thread before. It appears the OP has not posted since shortly after the OP.
Todd-get well and hope your A-fib goes away. As someone who has been intubated far too many times, cepacol lozenges and ice water and it should be gone.
If Mr. Dougald is lurking, a) come join our cycling thread in the Asylum; b) read up on "athlete's heart".
Athlete's heart does not cause A-fib per se from my layperson's understanding, but it does make things more complicated.
When I was hospitalized for months and months following two separate cycling debacles, I had A-fib and drove anesthesiologists nuts due to having athlete's heart. To be clear, the words after "and" in the preceding sentence are separate and distinct from my A-Fib.
You likely already know this, but if you start taking a PPI drug for you A-fib, your ability to get your heart rate up will be significantly limited. They act like a governor on an engine.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#37 Post by Brian Crabtree » May 28th, 2020, 5:45 pm

For sure, some people can have afib triggered by modest wine consumption, even after successful ablation. See my post in this thread from a year ago and another thread. I'm doing well at 14 months after a second ablation in March 2019 and following the literature recommendations of one 6 oz glass on non-consecutive days. Your mileage may vary. I can give citations for the research papers to support if anyone wants the evidence. The wine hobby is not what it once was, but I'm still enjoying it. Last night my wife and I had a glass each of Domaine Huet Vouvray Le Haut Lieu sec 2013, fantastic. The other half of the bottle is tomorrow night. That's the way it is for me now and I've accepted it as a new normal. Once again, not everybody has the same experience. Coffee, tea, and soft drinks are all decaf and I discovered I don't really miss the caffeine. The quality of decaf coffee is better nowadays than in the past, so if you enjoy coffee for the taste and experience of the coffee and not mainly the caffeine, you can still enjoy that luxury.

The discussion about wine with the EP cardiologist the morning after the procedure was interesting. He advised keeping consumption to no more than a 6 oz glass at a sitting. I said, "But you don't understand," and showed him a photo of my cellar. Without changing his expression, he just said, "That's going to last you a really long time."

Re medication, I stayed on both a rhythm control drug and blood thinner for 9 months after the second ablation. I'm off the rhythm control drug now and very happy about that. I will be on the blood thinner indefinitely because of the history of afib, age, and history of hypertension.

Todd, glad to hear you are doing well. Relax and do pretty much nothing for a week, then resume activities very gradually. No need to rush, every need to not rush. For me, I sat around for a week, went back to the office part-time the second week, went for a single 10 minute easy walk in the neighborhood the third week, two walks the fourth week, etc. I was brisk walking a half-hour five times per week plus some floor exercises at about 5 months.

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Re: Wine And A-Fib?

#38 Post by Nate Simon » May 28th, 2020, 6:01 pm

Todd F r e n c h wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 1:15 pm
Only side effects thus far (today, day after) are related to the intubation, I think.
Sure, Todd...blame anesthesia! It’s OK, we’re used to it. champagne.gif

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