Millennials and Wine

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FrankPy
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Millennials and Wine

#1 Post by FrankPy » April 1st, 2015, 2:27 pm

What do you think are some of the top ways Millennials find out about new wines? Same ways as Boomers and everybody else?

I'm thinking they learn about new wines they may want to try maybe in this order:

1. Friends
2. Retail pros
3. Online or Social Media

Suggestions appreciated.

Thanks,
Frank

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#2 Post by Benjamin Hand » April 1st, 2015, 2:31 pm

I'm guilty of being in the aforementioned demographic. My personal ranking would be:

1. Online (wine news, blogs, and message boards)
2. Books/Decanter Magazine
3. Occasionally friends

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#3 Post by Paul Luckin » April 1st, 2015, 2:42 pm

the most recent report i read noted how Millennials wanted to make a "connection" with the wine/winery. to me that would equate to meeting and interacting with the owner/winemaker at various events (think moderately to low priced festivals, organized tastings, etc.). second would be social media (Twitter and Instagram probably ahead of FB at this point).
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#4 Post by mseeber » April 2nd, 2015, 9:46 am

Dining out is likely a big source of new wine knowledge, especially when it is a restaurant that has a Millennial friendly vibe (organic, local, trendy, etc). These restaurants seem to feature less mainstream wines and opt for eclectic or unique.
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Millennials and Wine

#5 Post by Adam Z A K K A » December 5th, 2017, 9:12 am

In the same vein, but sorta not really, I think Millennials are increasingly going with spirits. Wine is in decline with young people. At least, in my experience running restaurants.

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#6 Post by Michael O'Brien » December 6th, 2017, 9:16 pm

My Millennial finds out about new wines when I supply them to her. She just got several Oregon PNs from me. All new to her. I am still her wine supplier and probably will remain so for some time to come.
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#7 Post by Betty C » December 13th, 2017, 12:28 pm

-Some inherited their parents' love of wine and take advantage of tasting with their club memberships, so nothing new per se
-Many discovered wines via a day of tasting in wine country (we're in the Bay Area)
-Some join wine clubs that send mixed cases
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#8 Post by Doug Schulman » December 22nd, 2017, 5:10 pm

Adam Z A K K A wrote:In the same vein, but sorta not really, I think Millennials are increasingly going with spirits. Wine is in decline with young people. At least, in my experience running restaurants.
I've seen market research showing the highest percentage of Millennials, by a considerable margin, stating that wine is their alcoholic beverage of choice.

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#9 Post by Doug Schulman » December 22nd, 2017, 5:19 pm

Some interesting statistics from a quick Google search:
Millennials of legal age, though only representing one-fourth of adults over 21, account for 35 percent of U.S. beer consumption and 32 percent of spirit consumption according to Nielson. The Wine Market Council reports that they consume 42 percent of all wine in the U.S.
http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/2 ... /96790132/

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#10 Post by Otto Forsberg » January 2nd, 2018, 4:28 am

Benjamin Hand wrote:I'm guilty of being in the aforementioned demographic. My personal ranking would be:

1. Online (wine news, blogs, and message boards)
2. Books/Decanter Magazine
3. Occasionally friends
As a fellow millenial, I second this.

Although I buy a lot of wines just out of curiosity - unknown regions, unknown varieties, a producer that seems interesting (based on short googling / website) etc. I also have a lot of friends who arrange tastings all the time (as do I); this way I get to taste a lot of interesting stuff and find new, interesting wines and producers.

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#11 Post by Yao C » January 20th, 2018, 9:26 pm

I'm a millennial and neither friends nor retail pros had anything to do with my wine discovery. It so happened that I was (still am) hugely into nice restaurants, and visited a couple of places that had some magical wines by the glass (e.g. 2006 Yquem at one place). These wines created some amazing experiences (millennials love experiences!) and ever since then it has been a tireless effort on my part to have further experiences at that level. Having said that, I've introduced many millennials to magic of aged Bordeaux (+Sauternes) over the past few years, so there is definitely something to friendships being a pathway
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#12 Post by Nick G A J E W S K I » February 2nd, 2018, 1:11 pm

I have an Instagram(http://www.instagram.com/chicago.wine.dude)wine blog and most of the people who follow me are millennials.

My order is below:
1. Social Media
2. Wine Experience(Going to Napa or their local wineries)
3. Dining
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#13 Post by AD Northup » February 3rd, 2018, 4:48 am

Millennial here. For me:

1. Online
2. Family
3. Friends in the business from previous trips
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#14 Post by mmarcellus » February 3rd, 2018, 7:40 am

Adam Z A K K A wrote:In the same vein, but sorta not really, I think Millennials are increasingly going with spirits. Wine is in decline with young people. At least, in my experience running restaurants.
I wonder if that's more a function of the choices they have in a restaurant. In many restaurants one can get a cocktail/spirits drink that you wouldn't make at home vs a BTG wine one could have at home (while paying the retail bottle price for that glass) . So they might skew towards spirits in a restaurant whereas they drink more wine at home.
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#15 Post by Drew Goin » February 3rd, 2018, 8:45 am

Michael O'Brien wrote:My Millennial finds out about new wines when I supply them to her. She just got several Oregon PNs from me. All new to her. I am still her wine supplier and probably will remain so for some time to come.

:P :P :P

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#16 Post by DominicRiccitello » February 5th, 2018, 1:05 pm

Social media is the biggest one and then friends. Possibly wine subscription boxes, but doubt most subscribe due to costs?

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#17 Post by Chris P0niatow$ki » March 8th, 2018, 9:02 pm

Wine educated millennial here. To find new wines I usually do research on Google and Youtube to discover new "terroir" that I haven't tried. As for making a decision on what specific producer/bottle to try, I use a combination of Vivino, Wine Searcher, and Cellartracker for more education/information before I make a purchase.

I still haven't tried buying wine online and tend to refrain from trying suggestions unless they are from my trusty wine pimp.

1. Online
2. Wine Pimp
3. Friends

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#18 Post by kris_lelis » October 31st, 2018, 1:03 pm

Being a millennial myself I could just add that visiting/living in a wine region can do a lot to your decision making when it comes to discovering new wines to try. Once you have spent a couple of months in Burgundy, Piedmont , Toscany you find our
T very quickly what kind of wines you tend to like and you just go from there

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#19 Post by Christian Obermanns » November 8th, 2018, 1:01 pm

Another millennial checking in, I recently got into collecting as a hobby after befriending a local winemaker and learning about the process. Since then, I've joined a few maker lists and deal sites (Lastbottle, etc.) and i'm trying wines from as many different regions as possible, picking up a bottle or 2 to put away when I find something I like. For me, the thought of putting something away for 20+ years to enjoy later is a lot of fun. Needless to say, I now have a rapidly expanding off-site storage locker.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#20 Post by Steve Crawford » November 19th, 2018, 1:30 pm

i am a millennial, but not a proud one. i have a cellar with around 200 bottles. i've been into wine long enough to really be done exploring regions or going into stores to shop. i like instagram to follow people whose taste is similar to that of mine. trying out wines these people have opened and enjoyed have which i am not yet aware of is enjoyable to me.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#21 Post by RichardFlack » November 19th, 2018, 4:50 pm

Adam Z A K K A wrote:
December 5th, 2017, 9:12 am
In the same vein, but sorta not really, I think Millennials are increasingly going with spirits. Wine is in decline with young people. At least, in my experience running restaurants.
Spirits or Cocktails?

...

The general issue is one that our wine club Board has been chewing on. I’ll post more when I’ve read the rest of the thread.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#22 Post by RichardFlack » November 19th, 2018, 4:55 pm

While I digest this ...
Millenials posting here are a biased sample of millennial wine enthusiasts.
(Ok I know, everyone here is a biased sample of wine enthusiasts generally).

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#23 Post by RichardFlack » November 19th, 2018, 4:58 pm

FrankPy wrote:
April 1st, 2015, 2:27 pm
What do you think are some of the top ways Millennials find out about new wines? Same ways as Boomers and everybody else?

I'm thinking they learn about new wines they may want to try maybe in this order:

1. Friends
2. Retail pros
3. Online or Social Media

Suggestions appreciated.

Thanks,
Frank
Are you enquiring about
- millenials in general
- millenial wine enthusiasts
- millenial Wineberserkers

I’m assuming it’s the 2nd category?

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#24 Post by Siun o'Connell » November 19th, 2018, 9:57 pm

I work in a coworking space with almost all millennials and there's a weekly happy hour every Thursday. The space puts out a ton of craft beer and a measly selection of wines - sometimes just a bland white and red, other times they may toss in a rose. I keep a stash at the office and open bottles for coworkers who are into or at least interested in wine relatively often but thats 3-4 out of ... a lot. But! about every other month the happy hour is hosted by yet another millennial targeting wine club with young earnest staff and bottles ... of drek. I try not to be obnoxious by pouring it out where they can see but good lord, I've rarely tasted so much bad wine ... these are not folks considering aging or even decanting and the stuff that gets poured is sooooo young it's crazy. The club model clearly has a lot of appeal and those hosts seem to get a lot of signups but it would be so lovely if someone launched a club with some quality options.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#25 Post by James.P.OSullivan » January 6th, 2019, 7:00 pm

I fall into this cohort, for me Instagram is a big one. I have Instagram page;

https://www.instagram.com/winestablished/

where I share wines and tasting notes as well as follow some great wine enthusiast. It's quite practical as there as you see the wine label/bottle, wine in the glass and tasting notes helps me identify new wines to try.

The other is decanter magazine for example (I have a subscription).

The best for last, going to the wine stores and wine bars and talking with the staff!

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#26 Post by Phil J. » January 6th, 2019, 9:08 pm

I’m in the group:

1. Online
2. In store, and only because I have a top notch wine store nearby
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#27 Post by J. Rock » March 12th, 2019, 5:22 pm

I am one and:

0. Friends got me into wine and show wines I haven't had, but now that I've been bitten by the wine bug the place where I most commonly find out about new wine is:
1. Internet (Reddit, this forum, Vivino, CellarTracker, online mags and general internet research)
2. Wine shops (asking for recommendations)
J o r d a n

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#28 Post by Michael O'Brien » March 17th, 2019, 10:14 am

My Millennial sent me a text yesterday to ask me if I have had biodynamic/natural wine. She said it is all the rage with Millennials. She lives in Millennial heaven -- Austin, TX. It is clear that neither she nor most of her friends know what either biodynamic or natural wines are. She mentioned Anders Frederik Steen and his "Let's Eat the World We Want to Live In" wine. I will admit that his wines have some catchy names especially to attract Millennials. What I am not certain of is how the news spreads. Word of mouth I suppose. Millennials also seem to think that this biodynamic and natural wine thing (they don't know the difference) is something new.

Clearly someone is finding a way to market to Millennials. This suggests to me that Millennials as a group are far more concerned about what they eat, drink, buy than previous generations. My take from that is that producers of all kinds of goods will be dragged kicking and screaming into producing more eco-conscious products. It also suggests that messaging will have to change if producers want to capture the Millennial market.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#29 Post by Jay Miller » March 17th, 2019, 3:01 pm

Michael O'Brien wrote:
March 17th, 2019, 10:14 am
My Millennial sent me a text yesterday to ask me if I have had biodynamic/natural wine. She said it is all the rage with Millennials. She lives in Millennial heaven -- Austin, TX. It is clear that neither she nor most of her friends know what either biodynamic or natural wines are. She mentioned Anders Frederik Steen and his "Let's Eat the World We Want to Live In" wine. I will admit that his wines have some catchy names especially to attract Millennials. What I am not certain of is how the news spreads. Word of mouth I suppose. Millennials also seem to think that this biodynamic and natural wine thing (they don't know the difference) is something new.

Clearly someone is finding a way to market to Millennials. This suggests to me that Millennials as a group are far more concerned about what they eat, drink, buy than previous generations. My take from that is that producers of all kinds of goods will be dragged kicking and screaming into producing more eco-conscious products. It also suggests that messaging will have to change if producers want to capture the Millennial market.
Oh, the marketing is already happening in all sorts of areas. Just as in the late 90s everyone was adding . or i to their names now everything has an endearing story of being founded by immigrants or being based on an old family recipe or being "organic" (based on the incredibly loose and virtually meaningless federal standards), gluten free (I roll my eyes every time I see a bag of rice labeled gluten free) or non-GMO (a virtually meaningless pronouncement). I almost lost it when I saw a Ragu TV commercial for their spaghetti sauce (one of the most revolting, large scale commercial products out there) focusing on how their product was all about authenticity and the Italian immigrant grandmother who rounded it. Natural wine has gone from a niche market to a huge thing where the quality of the wine (something that attracted to me many of the early natural or naturalish producers) is irrelevant so long as it's labeled "natural".

But the sad thing is, it works.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#30 Post by Michael O'Brien » March 17th, 2019, 4:08 pm

I agree Jay. The marketing is heading that way. There are a lot of articles published about marketing wine to millennials. In the long haul, marketing won't be enough. Millennials will figure out when the message is not borne out by the product.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#31 Post by Josh Espinosa » April 23rd, 2019, 5:33 pm

I am within that the demographic and I’d nail it down to three areas:

1) Word of Mouth (Instagram, friends)
2) Wine Searcher App
3) Critics

Millennials are a tough crowd to please giving their need and speed for things to fulfill what they want there and now vs waiting for something to mature and evolve over time. My thought and concern is that whether the older collectors and baby boomers notice or not is that they are purchasing more and consuming much less per week. This begs the question, what age group will shore up the sales in that area once the older demo is phased out? Just a thought

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#32 Post by Corey Porche » January 11th, 2020, 11:41 am

I am 29 and I've been collecting for 5 years. I've received my knowledge from my family who drinks wine. Then I follow wine enthusiast on Instagram. I've always had a strong knowledge on 1st growth Bordeaux, but I seek out other vineyards through social media. I also have an Instagram where i post the wines a purchase.

https://www.instagram.com/atlwinecollector/

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#33 Post by matthewgoldman » January 28th, 2020, 6:35 pm

Did Boomers buy wine at the same ages as Millennials are now? The oldest Millennial is 38 using the 1982-1996 generation boundaries, which I think is the normal way to do it. Were the older folks in this forum collecting wine at 32? I often wonder if it's not a problem, but many Millennials aren't maybe quite there from a money and life stage yet? Then Gen X is a bit smaller so it creates a dip in wine buying that may come back in future years.

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Disclaimer: I qualify as a Millennial.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#34 Post by Benny P » January 29th, 2020, 5:15 pm

I'm on the older side of the Millennial generation boundaries and I would say my primary method is through 1) older friends/clients word of mouth and 2) social media (primarily deals with volume discounting and free shipping).

I don't pay much as much attention to critic scores but trusting some of my older friends that have had more experience with wine. I will agree with Matthew above in that my friends that are more my contemporaries in age are only beginning to more heavily get into wine and is primarily a function of money and where they are at now with their careers. I still find it difficult to do wine tastings with my contemporaries as craft beers get more of their attention with beer tasting gatherings occurring quite frequently.

Only five years ago, we were primarily drinking beers and taking shots of tequila, but now we are gravitating towards higher-priced whiskies and wines.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#35 Post by Eric Lundblad » February 5th, 2020, 2:05 pm

matthewgoldman wrote:
January 28th, 2020, 6:35 pm
Did Boomers buy wine at the same ages as Millennials are now? The oldest Millennial is 38 using the 1982-1996 generation boundaries, which I think is the normal way to do it. Were the older folks in this forum collecting wine at 32? I often wonder if it's not a problem, but many Millennials aren't maybe quite there from a money and life stage yet? Then Gen X is a bit smaller so it creates a dip in wine buying that may come back in future years.

Let's not blame it all on White Claw

Disclaimer: I qualify as a Millennial.
According to current & prior Silicon Valley Bank 'State of the Wine Union Address' (almost their name): in 2012, 24-34 year olds were 14% of wine purchasing...the current report has millennials (23-38 yo) as 17%. So, if you believe those numbers, millennials are buying more than the prior blended group of gen-x+millennials.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#36 Post by Peter Petersen » February 15th, 2020, 1:50 pm

Eric Lundblad wrote:
February 5th, 2020, 2:05 pm
matthewgoldman wrote:
January 28th, 2020, 6:35 pm
Did Boomers buy wine at the same ages as Millennials are now? The oldest Millennial is 38 using the 1982-1996 generation boundaries, which I think is the normal way to do it. Were the older folks in this forum collecting wine at 32? I often wonder if it's not a problem, but many Millennials aren't maybe quite there from a money and life stage yet? Then Gen X is a bit smaller so it creates a dip in wine buying that may come back in future years.

Let's not blame it all on White Claw

Disclaimer: I qualify as a Millennial.
According to current & prior Silicon Valley Bank 'State of the Wine Union Address' (almost their name): in 2012, 24-34 year olds were 14% of wine purchasing...the current report has millennials (23-38 yo) as 17%. So, if you believe those numbers, millennials are buying more than the prior blended group of gen-x+millennials.
"OK Boomer" here. I've been fairly serious about wine since I was 18.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#37 Post by Michael O'Brien » February 17th, 2020, 2:28 pm

Peter Petersen wrote:
February 15th, 2020, 1:50 pm
Eric Lundblad wrote:
February 5th, 2020, 2:05 pm
matthewgoldman wrote:
January 28th, 2020, 6:35 pm
Did Boomers buy wine at the same ages as Millennials are now? The oldest Millennial is 38 using the 1982-1996 generation boundaries, which I think is the normal way to do it. Were the older folks in this forum collecting wine at 32? I often wonder if it's not a problem, but many Millennials aren't maybe quite there from a money and life stage yet? Then Gen X is a bit smaller so it creates a dip in wine buying that may come back in future years.

Let's not blame it all on White Claw

Disclaimer: I qualify as a Millennial.
According to current & prior Silicon Valley Bank 'State of the Wine Union Address' (almost their name): in 2012, 24-34 year olds were 14% of wine purchasing...the current report has millennials (23-38 yo) as 17%. So, if you believe those numbers, millennials are buying more than the prior blended group of gen-x+millennials.
"OK Boomer" here. I've been fairly serious about wine since I was 18.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#38 Post by Bas_vm » February 26th, 2020, 5:04 am

Many of my friends are still very into gin/tonic - craft beer and when they are starting getting more into wine most of them are looking for natural wines. However many average restaurant / winebar / sommelier are promoting natural wines.

I am getting my information most of the time from magazines, (pro)reviews, online, wine-searcher, forums and Instagram.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#39 Post by Aalok Patel » February 26th, 2020, 5:43 pm

Similar to Bas_vm, most of my millennial friends prefer hard alcohol or beer. The few that have gotten into wine tend to engage through social media (Instagram) or recommendations from celebrities they align with (going to places that Eric Wareheim and Amy Schumer recommend, for example). I would say 90% of my friends who have proactively taken an interest in wine just opt for places like Scribe, Sophie James, and Ashes & Diamonds. IMO focusing more on the "social experience" and shareable aspects of a winery (Instagram friendly) with the wines themselves taking a secondary priority in their decision making process.

Most of my knowledge to date has come through trial/error and then proactively seeking resources (I'll Drink to That, Jon Bonne's New California Wine, Wine Bible, Burghound, Prince of Pinot, etc.) to understand more about *why* I liked a particular wine. Looking forward to reading a few more books on specific regions and of course scouring this forum for a wealth of knowledge.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#40 Post by Michael O'Brien » February 28th, 2020, 7:56 am

My youngest and her husband moved from beer, to mezcal and tequila because that was what many of their friends were drinking. Living in Texas helps that along. But she is also interested in wine largely because I started to train her when she was young to smell and taste. I even used a Le Nez du Vin to help her understand aromas. She also traveled to Europe with us when she was much younger, went to a French school from age 3 to 14, and she and her husband travel to Europe frequently now as well. In other words, wine has been a part of her cultural experience for a long time. It doesn't hurt that I supply the wine :)

I have been a little dismayed recently because she and her friends have been caught up by the "Natty" wine movement without understanding what is is. Natty or Natural have become marketing terms that are used to convey meaning and quality when the terms have no agreed meaning. The promise is enough to entice young wine lovers with little experience to drink wine that isn't well made. We all know there are excellent wines made with minimal intervention that have been around for decades now. But once marketing gets hold of an idea, you just have to let it burn out. As young wine drinkers continue to taste, their tastes like ours will evolve. I have hope.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#41 Post by Josh Grossman » February 28th, 2020, 8:42 am

The things I've heard most is a perception that wine makes people sleepy and sulphur dioxide gives hangovers. I think the perception that natural wines are healthier and doesn't give as bad of hangovers, and often 'organic' or biodynamic (i.e. good for the earth) is the selling point over the taste. Health and social responsibility are prerequisites for younger consumers.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#42 Post by Michael O'Brien » February 29th, 2020, 12:51 pm

Josh Grossman wrote:
February 28th, 2020, 8:42 am
The things I've heard most is a perception that wine makes people sleepy and sulphur dioxide gives hangovers. I think the perception that natural wines are healthier and doesn't give as bad of hangovers, and often 'organic' or biodynamic (i.e. good for the earth) is the selling point over the taste. Health and social responsibility are prerequisites for younger consumers.
If only perception were reality. Social responsibility and health are important to all of us but we have the "perception" that it is the domain of the young. Perception is often the result of marketing. Remember all the designer clothes and shoes your kids just had to have when they were younger. I lived through that with five children. Thank goodness they outgrew it. Contemporary minimal intervention wines have been around at least since the 1960s driven by a few producers in Beaujolais. Then the Loire etc. The difference now is that Millennials are being SOLD "natural or natty" wines as though they were a panacea; as though they were something brand new to the world. It is a good thing that they are considering and starting to try more wine. With time, they will evolve as we have, to well-made wines by great producers. Some of those wines will have minimal intervention. Some will not. As the parent of one Millenial, two Boomers, and to Gen X'ers, my responsibility is to guide them and encourage them to try different wine from different regions to develop their palates and their preferences. My palate did not evolve on its own. It evolved in the company of others some far more experienced and some less so. It was a team effort.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#43 Post by Sean S y d n e y » March 1st, 2020, 8:32 pm

As one of those pesky millennials - who works at a wine bar - I can tell you that there's definitely interest in wine amongst peers but there's a) a fiscal barrier to entry and b) an intimidation factor that goes along with requiring knowledge to make purchasing decisions that can seem overwhelming and hostile.

I think the higher-than-average interest in natural/non-intervention/non-typical wine amongst my demographic is a way for people my age and my income bracket to stake a claim and aesthetic in the wine world without having to run the gamut of the usual gatekeepers, both financial and otherwise. It simply isn't feasible for most of us to methodically make our way through the premier regions and styles of the wine world without encountering some major difficulties, so we marry our desire for sincerity and thoughtful production with our curiosity. Natural wine provides an affordable and interesting outlet for curiosity and community.

For the record, I think having a foundation in the classics is really beneficial to a comprehensive appreciation of wine. But for hobbyists who are looking for a way to connect with peers over some cool drinks, the finer points of bottles Bordeaux older than we are and more than our rent are largely lost on us. It stands to reason that the way we get our information is different, too; we want it from "authentic" sources like friends, age-appropriate expertise, and wines that seem to tap into the larger social consciousness.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#44 Post by Michael O'Brien » March 2nd, 2020, 10:50 am

Certainly not pesky Sean. As I mentioned previously, my youngest daughter is a Millennial. It isn't that she doesn't know and appreciate good wine. She has been drinking from my cellar since she was young. She still shares with me the wines she tries and likes and those she does not. She is also happy to accept wines from my cellar. In spite of her experience with well made wines, she and her husband have still gotten caught up in the Natty wine marketing machine. Before that "fad" they got caught up in the mezcal craze. Before that, vodka. And so forth.

As you well know there are many excellent wines that do not cost more than your rent unless you are living in your parent's basement. Learning to appreciate good wine is a journey. I took the journey with help and encouragement from others and I am hopeful that the new generation of wine drinkers will evolve. That will take encouragement and tasting. You are in the perfect position to help them evolve. In my opinion, Millenials are much like we were when we were younger. They latch onto the things that are supposedly new and improved. Eventually they will learn whether or not they are really new and/or really improved. But that won't happen without some guidance. Until then, let them drink mezcal.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#45 Post by Sean S y d n e y » March 3rd, 2020, 7:21 am

Absolutely! I'm interested to see whether natural wine becomes a gateway drug of sorts to more classic regions for a lot of people my age or whether they'll stay in that zone (or move out to something entirely different when it becomes slightly less cool). Anything that brings people into wine or gets them more interested in the subject is a good thing.

Ultimately, I just try to bring as much enthusiasm as I can to the gig (not really tough if you actually love what you're selling!) and make it as welcoming and inclusive an environment as I can. Show, not tell.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#46 Post by Michael O'Brien » March 3rd, 2020, 9:08 pm

Sean S y d n e y wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 7:21 am
Absolutely! I'm interested to see whether natural wine becomes a gateway drug of sorts to more classic regions for a lot of people my age or whether they'll stay in that zone (or move out to something entirely different when it becomes slightly less cool). Anything that brings people into wine or gets them more interested in the subject is a good thing.

Ultimately, I just try to bring as much enthusiasm as I can to the gig (not really tough if you actually love what you're selling!) and make it as welcoming and inclusive an environment as I can. Show, not tell.
I would have benefited from someone like you Sean, when I was starting out. I would have better understood the process of learning about and tasting different wine to discover what you love. It would have saved me a lot of money that I spent unwisely too.
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#47 Post by Sean S y d n e y » March 4th, 2020, 7:33 am

Michael O'Brien wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 9:08 pm

I would have benefited from someone like you Sean, when I was starting out. I would have better understood the process of learning about and tasting different wine to discover what you love. It would have saved me a lot of money that I spent unwisely too.
That's really kind of you, Michael! I'm sure you ended up okay in the end. :)

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#48 Post by Robert Wylie » May 27th, 2020, 7:16 am

Sean S y d n e y wrote:
March 1st, 2020, 8:32 pm
As one of those pesky millennials - who works at a wine bar - I can tell you that there's definitely interest in wine amongst peers but there's a) a fiscal barrier to entry and b) an intimidation factor that goes along with requiring knowledge to make purchasing decisions that can seem overwhelming and hostile.

I think the higher-than-average interest in natural/non-intervention/non-typical wine amongst my demographic is a way for people my age and my income bracket to stake a claim and aesthetic in the wine world without having to run the gamut of the usual gatekeepers, both financial and otherwise. It simply isn't feasible for most of us to methodically make our way through the premier regions and styles of the wine world without encountering some major difficulties, so we marry our desire for sincerity and thoughtful production with our curiosity. Natural wine provides an affordable and interesting outlet for curiosity and community.

For the record, I think having a foundation in the classics is really beneficial to a comprehensive appreciation of wine. But for hobbyists who are looking for a way to connect with peers over some cool drinks, the finer points of bottles Bordeaux older than we are and more than our rent are largely lost on us. It stands to reason that the way we get our information is different, too; we want it from "authentic" sources like friends, age-appropriate expertise, and wines that seem to tap into the larger social consciousness.
I too am a pesky millennial of the English variety. Agree with a lot of what you say, definitely a few starting barriers with millenials getting into wine. Think it takes a bit of effort to develop preferences and understanding different wines which may put some off? Luckily I've always shared wine with my dad who gave me a great deal of exposure to different wine from a young age.

I believe a lot of my generation buy into natural wine in combination environmental factors and fair trade/pricing. We perhaps put more weight on the ethics, meaning and story of the wine compared to the heritage. An area I'm looking to service with www.vinumipsum.com which is launching this week.

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Re: Millennials and Wine

#49 Post by Yao C » May 27th, 2020, 9:47 am

Sean S y d n e y wrote:
March 1st, 2020, 8:32 pm
I think the higher-than-average interest in natural/non-intervention/non-typical wine amongst my demographic is a way for people my age and my income bracket to stake a claim and aesthetic in the wine world without having to run the gamut of the usual gatekeepers, both financial and otherwise.
I think this is one of the most insightful things I've read on here [cheers.gif]

Certainly I am, and I think most people are, as susceptible to brands/labels/groupthink as what's in the glass
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Re: Millennials and Wine

#50 Post by Andrew_L » July 22nd, 2020, 8:03 pm

Wholeheartedly agree with Yao C and Sean's comment.
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